Article

International study of factors affecting human chromosome translocations

Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis (Impact Factor: 4.44). 04/2008; 652(2):112-21. DOI: 10.1016/j.mrgentox.2008.01.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Chromosome translocations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of normal, healthy humans increase with age, but the effects of gender, race, and cigarette smoking on background translocation yields have not been examined systematically. Further, the shape of the relationship between age and translocation frequency (TF) has not been definitively determined. We collected existing data from 16 laboratories in North America, Europe, and Asia on TFs measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridization whole chromosome painting among 1933 individuals. In Poisson regression models, age, ranging from newborns (cord blood) to 85 years, was strongly associated with TF and this relationship showed significant upward curvature at older ages versus a linear relationship (p<0.001). Ever smokers had significantly higher TFs than non-smokers (rate ratio (RR)=1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.30) and smoking modified the effect of age on TFs with a steeper age-related increase among ever smokers compared to non-smokers (p<0.001). TFs did not differ by gender. Interpreting an independent effect of race was difficult owing to laboratory variation. Our study is three times larger than any pooled effort to date, confirming a suspected curvilinear relationship of TF with age. The significant effect of cigarette smoking has not been observed with previous pooled studies of TF in humans. Our data provide stable estimates of background TF by age, gender, race, and smoking status and suggest an acceleration of chromosome damage above age 60 and among those with a history of smoking cigarettes.

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    • "common protocol , and then , the scoring results were combined together . URCRM and HPE scored all the slides , and LUMC contributed to scoring of one - third of the slides . The data based on at least 300 genome equivalent ( GE ) cells per donor ( 802 GE cells , on average ) were considered in the study to reduce the interlaboratory variability ( Sigurdson et al . 2008 ) ."
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    • "common protocol , and then , the scoring results were combined together . URCRM and HPE scored all the slides , and LUMC contributed to scoring of one - third of the slides . The data based on at least 300 genome equivalent ( GE ) cells per donor ( 802 GE cells , on average ) were considered in the study to reduce the interlaboratory variability ( Sigurdson et al . 2008 ) ."
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