Article

A20 is a negative regulator of BCL10- and CARMA3-mediated activation of NF-kappa B

Dip. Scienze Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università degli Studi del Sannio di Benevento, Via Port'Arsa 11, 82100 Benevento, Italy.
Journal of Cell Science (Impact Factor: 5.33). 05/2008; 121(Pt 8):1165-71. DOI: 10.1242/jcs.021105
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The molecular complex containing CARMA proteins, BCL10 and TRAF6 has been identified recently as a key component in the signal transduction pathways that regulate activation of the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription factor. Here, we report that the inducible protein A20 negatively regulates these signaling cascades by means of its deubiquitylation activity. We show that A20 perturbs assembly of the complex containing CARMA3, BCL10 and IKKgamma/NEMO, thereby suppressing activation of NF-kappaB. Together, our results further define the molecular mechanisms that control activation of NF-kappaB and reveal a function for A20 in the regulation of CARMA and BCL10 activity in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells.

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Available from: Ettore Varricchio, May 28, 2015
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