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How Much Physical Activity Is Needed To Maintain Erectile Function? Results of the Androx Vienna Municipality Study

Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
European Urology (Impact Factor: 12.48). 03/2008; 55(2):509-16. DOI: 10.1016/j.eururo.2008.02.020
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To assess the correlation of erectile function (EF) and physical activity (PhA) by using standardized, validated instruments in healthy men.
A urologist examined 674 men aged 45-60 yr at their place of work. That included a urological physical examination, medical history, and assessment of testosterone (T) and sex hormone-binding globulin; all men completed the 5-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) as well as the Paffenbarger score. PhA was assessed in kilojoules per week (4.2 kJ=1 kcal).
A positive correlation between the IIEF-5 and the Paffenbarger score (r=0.164, p<0.001) was found. The IIEF-5 score increased with an increasing Paffenbarger score up to a level of 4000 kcal/wk. T revealed a trend to a significant impact on the IIEF-5 score, but showed no association with the Paffenbarger score. The risk of severe erectile dysfunction (ED) was decreased by 82.9% for males with PhA of at least 3000 kcal/wk compared with males with PhA under 3000 kcal/wk (OR=0.171, p=0.018).
Increasing PhA from 1000 to 4000 kcal/wk may reduce the risk of ED.

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    • "T revealed a trend to a significant impact on the IIEF-5 score, but showed no association with the Paffenbarger score. The risk of severe erectile dysfunction (ED) was decreased by 82.9% for males with PhA of at least 3000 kcal/wk compared with males with PhA under 3000 kcal/wk (Kratzik et al, 2009). "
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of erectile dysfunction is high in men of all ages and increases greatly in the elderly. In particular, severity and prevalence both increase with aging. Because erectile dysfunction is a symptom, physicians should diagnose underlying pathologies that might lead to it instead of focusing only on finding a viable treatment. Physical inactivity negatively impacts on erectile function; experimental and clinical exercise interventions have been shown to improve sexual responses and overall cardiovascular health. Several studies have confirmed that combining 2 interventions (Mediterranean diet and physical activity) provides additional benefit to erectile function, likely via reduced metabolic disturbances (eg, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance), decreased visceral adipose tissue, and improvement in vascular function (eg, increased endothelial function). This brief review shows the main clinical evidence of benefits induced by physical activity on erectile and endothelial dysfunction. The literature shows that erectile dysfunction in middle-aged men is often an early event in endothelial damage, and physical activity is able to improve both erectile and endothelial dysfunction. There are conflicting data regarding the effects of exercise on androgen status. In clinical practice it would be recommended to add regular physical activity to balanced diet and drugs to achieve better therapeutic results.
    Journal of Andrology 05/2011; 33(2):154-61. DOI:10.2164/jandrol.111.013649 · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the correlation of erectile function (EF) and physical activity (PhA) by using standardized, validated instruments in healthy men. A urologist examined 674 men aged 45-60 yr at their place of work. That included a urological physical examination, medical history, and assessment of testosterone (T) and sex hormone-binding globulin; all men completed the 5-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) as well as the Paffenbarger score. PhA was assessed in kilojoules per week (4.2 kJ=1 kcal). A positive correlation between the IIEF-5 and the Paffenbarger score (r=0.164, p<0.001) was found. The IIEF-5 score increased with an increasing Paffenbarger score up to a level of 4000 kcal/wk. T revealed a trend to a significant impact on the IIEF-5 score, but showed no association with the Paffenbarger score. The risk of severe erectile dysfunction (ED) was decreased by 82.9% for males with PhA of at least 3000 kcal/wk compared with males with PhA under 3000 kcal/wk (OR=0.171, p=0.018). Increasing PhA from 1000 to 4000 kcal/wk may reduce the risk of ED.
    European Urology 03/2008; 55(2):509-16. DOI:10.1016/j.eururo.2008.02.020 · 12.48 Impact Factor
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