Article

A benefit-risk review of systemic haemostatic agents: Part 2: In excessive or heavy menstrual bleeding

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
Drug Safety (Impact Factor: 2.62). 02/2008; 31(4):275-82.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The first part of this benefit-risk review examined the efficacy and adverse effect profiles of systemic haemostatic agents commonly used in major surgery. The second part of this review examines the efficacy and adverse effect profiles of systemic haemostatic agents commonly used in the treatment of excessive or heavy menstrual bleeding, and provides individual benefit-risk profiles that may assist clinicians in selecting appropriate pharmacological therapy in this setting. Historically, surgery has played a dominant role in treatment; however, pharmacological therapy is increasingly popular, especially in women who wish to retain their fertility. When selecting the appropriate treatment, patient preference should be considered, as well as the benefits and risks associated with each agent. Recommended pharmacological therapies that are effective and generally well tolerated include the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and the oral agents tranexamic acid, NSAIDs (e.g. mefenamic acid) and combined estrogen/progestogen oral contraceptives. In patients with an underlying bleeding disorder (e.g. von Willebrand disease), an additional option is intranasal desmopressin.

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