Article

Therapeutic cloning in individual parkinsonian mice.

Department of Neurosurgery, Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1275 York Ave, New York, New York 10065, USA.
Nature medicine (Impact Factor: 28.05). 05/2008; 14(4):379-81. DOI: 10.1038/nm1732
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cell transplantation with embryonic stem (ES) cell progeny requires immunological compatibility with host tissue. 'Therapeutic cloning' is a strategy to overcome this limitation by generating nuclear transfer (nt)ES cells that are genetically matched to an individual. Here we establish the feasibility of treating individual mice via therapeutic cloning. Derivation of 187 ntES cell lines from 24 parkinsonian mice, dopaminergic differentiation, and transplantation into individually matched host mice showed therapeutic efficacy and lack of immunological response.

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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lmx1a plays a central role in the specification of dopaminergic (DA) neurons, which potentially could be employed as a key factor for trans-differentiation to DA neurons. In our previous study, we have converted somatic cells directly into neural stem cell – like cells, namely induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), which further can be differentiated into subtypes of neurons and glia in vitro. In the present study, we continued to test whether these iNSCs have therapeutic effects when transplanted into a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease (PD), especially when Lmx1a was introduced into these iNSCs under a Nestin enhancer. iNSCs that over-expressed Lmx1a (iNSC-Lmx1a) gave rise to an increased yield of dopaminergic neurons and secreted a higher level of dopamine in vitro. When transplanted into mouse models of PD, both groups of mice showed decreased ipsilateral rotations; yet mice that received iNSC-Lmx1a vs. iNSC-GFP exhibited better recovery. Although few iNSCs survived 11 weeks after transplantation, the improved motor performance in iNSC-Lmx1a group did correlate with a greater tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) signal abundance in the lesioned area of striatum, suggesting that iNSCs may have worked through a non-autonomous manner to enhance the functions of remaining endogenous dopaminergic neurons in brain.

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