Article

Therapeutic cloning in individual parkinsonian mice.

Department of Neurosurgery, Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1275 York Ave, New York, New York 10065, USA.
Nature medicine (Impact Factor: 27.14). 05/2008; 14(4):379-81. DOI: 10.1038/nm1732
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cell transplantation with embryonic stem (ES) cell progeny requires immunological compatibility with host tissue. 'Therapeutic cloning' is a strategy to overcome this limitation by generating nuclear transfer (nt)ES cells that are genetically matched to an individual. Here we establish the feasibility of treating individual mice via therapeutic cloning. Derivation of 187 ntES cell lines from 24 parkinsonian mice, dopaminergic differentiation, and transplantation into individually matched host mice showed therapeutic efficacy and lack of immunological response.

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