Article

Point/Counterpoint. Cone beam x-ray CT will be superior to digital x-ray tomosynthesis in imaging the breast and delineating cancer.

Radiology Department, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, USA.
Medical Physics (Impact Factor: 3.01). 03/2008; 35(2):409-11. DOI: 10.1118/1.2825612
Source: PubMed

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Available from: Colin G Orton, Jun 02, 2015
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