Article

Lewy bodies in grafted neurons in subjects with Parkinson's disease suggest host-to-graft disease propagation.

Neuronal Survival Unit, Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, Department of Experimental Medical Science, 221 84 Lund, Sweden.
Nature medicine (Impact Factor: 28.05). 06/2008; 14(5):501-3. DOI: 10.1038/nm1746
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Two subjects with Parkinson's disease who had long-term survival of transplanted fetal mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons (11-16 years) developed alpha-synuclein-positive Lewy bodies in grafted neurons. Our observation has key implications for understanding Parkinson's pathogenesis by providing the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the disease can propagate from host to graft cells. However, available data suggest that the majority of grafted cells are functionally unimpaired after a decade, and recipients can still experience long-term symptomatic relief.

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May 20, 2014