Article

Dietary Intakes of Selected Nutrients and Food Groups and Risk of Cervical Cancer

Department of Mathematics, State University of New York College at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14222, USA.
Nutrition and Cancer (Impact Factor: 2.47). 05/2008; 60(3):331-41. DOI: 10.1080/01635580701861769
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We investigated the relationships between intakes of selected dietary nutrients and food groups and risk of cervical cancer in a hospital-based, case-control study including 239 cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and 979 hospital patients with nonneoplastic diagnoses who completed a self-administered questionnaire between 1982 and 1998 at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age, education, smoking status, use of oral contraceptives, barrier contraceptives and spermicides, family history of cervical cancer, year questionnaire completed, and energy intake. Significant reductions in risk of approximately 40-60% were observed for women in the highest vs. lowest tertiles of dietary fiber (OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.37-0.94), vitamin C (OR=0.52, 95% CI=0.33-0.80), vitamin E (OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.27-0.72), vitamin A (OR=0.47, 95% CI=0.30-0.73), alpha-carotene (OR=0.41, 95% CI=0.27-0.63), beta-carotene (OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.29-0.68), lutein (OR=0.51, 95% CI=0.33-0.79), folate (OR=0.55, 95% CI=0.34-0.88), and total fruit and vegetable intake (OR=0.52, 95% CI=0.34-0.77). Our findings suggest that a diet rich in plant-based nutrients may be important in reducing the risk of cervical cancer.

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    • "Recently, fruits and vegetable consumption have been shown to be inversely related to cancer mortality (Willett, 2002), and provides the foundation for food based approaches to cancer prevention . It has been observed that diet rich in plant-based nutrients is important in reducing the risk of cervical cancer (Ghosh et al., 2008). In the present study, fruit flavonoid naringin exerted potent Fig. 4 "
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    • "Recently, fruits and vegetable consumption have been shown to be inversely related to cancer mortality (Willett, 2002), and provides the foundation for food based approaches to cancer prevention . It has been observed that diet rich in plant-based nutrients is important in reducing the risk of cervical cancer (Ghosh et al., 2008). In the present study, fruit flavonoid naringin exerted potent Fig. 4 "
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    ABSTRACT: Cervical cancer is the second most common female cancer worldwide, and it remains a challenge to manage preinvasive and invasive lesions. Fruit-based cancer prevention entities, such as flavonoid and their derivatives, have demonstrated a marked ability to inhibit preclinical models of epithelial cancer cell growth and tumor formation. Here, we extend the role of naringin-mediated chemoprevention to that of cervical carcinogenesis. The present study sought to investigate the therapeutic potential effect of naringin on apoptosis in human cervical SiHa cancer cells. Viability of SiHa cells was evaluated by the MTT assay, apoptosis and mitochondrial transmembrane potential by flow cytometry, and pro-apoptotic related genes by Real-time quantitative PCR. Naringin showed a 50% inhibition of SiHa human cervical cancer cells at a concentration of 750μM. SiHa cells exhibited apoptotic cell death, intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation, morphological changes and decline in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In addition, administration of naringin increased the expression of caspases, p53 and Bax, Fas death receptor and its adaptor protein FADD. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by naringin is through both death-receptor and mitochondrial pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that naringin might be an effective agent to treat human cervical cancer.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 07/2012; 51C(1):97-105. DOI:10.1016/j.fct.2012.07.033 · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    • "Furthermore, unlike AA-2αG and Vc, the preparation and/or manufacture of AA-2βG by either chemical synthesis or enzymatic synthesis is very inefficient, making AA-2βG from L. barbarum fruit as a reliable resource of this compound for its potential application in clinic as a stable Vc substitution (Takebayashi et al. 2008; Toyada-Ono et al. 2005; Toyoda-Ono et al. 2004). Previous studies have demonstrated that a high intake of vitamin C can reduce the risk of cervical cancer (Ghosh et al. 2008; Kim et al. 2010; Mirvish 1986a, b). However, the exact reasons Vc appears to be protective of or prevent cervical cancer remain poorly understood, but possible mechanisms may involve stimulation of the immune system, antioxidant activity, inhibition of oncogene transformation, and interactions with other vitamins such as folate (Potischman and Brinton 1996; Rock et al. 2000, 2001). "
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    ABSTRACT: Lycium barbarum fruit has been used as a Chinese traditional medicine and dietary supplement for centuries. 2-O-β-d-Glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2βG), a novel stable vitamin C analog, is one of the main biologically active components of the fruit. In this report, we investigated the cytotoxic and antiproliferative effect of AA-2βG against cancer cells in vitro and identified the proteins with significantly differential expression in the cervical cancer cells (Hela) cultured in the presence of AA-2βG proteomic analysis. Our results demonstrated that the cytotoxic and antiproliferative activity of AA-2βG on cancer cell lines were in a cell type-, time-, and dose-dependent manner. Similar to vitamin C, the AA-2βG selectively induced cell death repressed the proliferation of Hela cells by the mechanism of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest induced by AA-2βG through a mechanism of stabilizing p53 protein. However, the biological activity of inhibition of cell proliferation in other malignant cancer cell lines or primary cells were varied, as demonstrated by either moderate inhibition or slight promotion following treatment with AA-2βG. Comparative analysis of the proteomic profiles and immunoblot analysis identified 15 proteins associated with repressing cell apoptosis and/or stimulating cell proliferation in Hela cells that were downregulated in the presence of AA-2βG or vitamin C. These data indicate that a mechanism of the AA-2βG and vitamin C mediated antitumor activity by downregulating the expression of proteins involved in cell apoptosis and proliferation and consequently inducing Hela cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, suggesting that AA-2βG and vitamin C may share a similar mechanism of inducing Hela cell apoptosis. These results also suggest that the L. barbarum fruit may be a potential dietary supplement and anticancer agent aimed at the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer.
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