Article

Cognition and brain imaging in type 1 diabetes

Joslin Diabetes Center, 1 Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
Current Diabetes Reports (Impact Factor: 3.38). 05/2008; 8(2):132-7. DOI: 10.1007/s11892-008-0024-z
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Type 1 diabetes has mild effects on cognition that are influenced by age of onset, hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemic episodes. Some of these changes occur quite early in the disease course. Studies using relatively new brain imaging techniques have also shown brain changes in adults and children that appear to be influenced by metabolic abnormalities present in diabetes. Early detections of brain changes may be early indicators of subsequent cognitive abnormalities.

0 Followers
 · 
63 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Symptom control in chronic illnesses like diabetes type 1 and asthma may be related to children's self-regulation both negatively and positively. We show how quality of symptom control is related to parents' and children's assessments of their self-regulatory skills (eg. behavioral inhibition, shifting, planning, monitoring and emotional control). Children with both chronic illnesses are compared with healthy peers and children with ADHD. According to parent's reports patients with diabetes with a history of acute hipo-or hyperglycemia and higher glycated hemoglobin as well as patients with poorly controlled asthma symptoms, more intensive treatment and acute attacks manifest more problems in self-regulation than their healthy peers but less than children with ADHD. Children with diabetes with low-glycated hemoglobin assess their behavior regulation better than their healthy peers.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Symptom control in chronic illnesses like diabetes type 1 and asthma may be related to children's self-regulation both negatively and positively. We show how quality of symptom control is related to parents' and children's assessments of their self-regulatory skills (eg. behavioral inhibition, shifting, planning, monitoring and emotional control). Children with both chronic illnesses are compared with healthy peers and children with ADHD. According to parent's reports patients with diabetes with a history of acute hipo-or hyperglycemia and higher glycated hemoglobin as well as patients with poorly controlled asthma symptoms, more intensive treatment and acute attacks manifest more problems in self-regulation than their healthy peers but less than children with ADHD. Children with diabetes with low-glycated hemoglobin assess their behavior regulation better than their healthy peers.
    Polish Journal of Applied Psychology 01/2013; 12(2):169-185. DOI:10.2478/v10167-010-0069-2
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IntroductionType 1 Diabetes (T1D) can have a significant impact on brain structure and function, which is referred to: ‘Type 1 diabetes-associated cognitive decline’ (T1DACD). Diabetes duration, early onset diseases and diabetes associated complications are all proposed as contributing factors for sustaining a T1DACD. However, no comparison between the differences in children and adults with T1D are made. To obtain more clarity into the occurrence and effects of a T1DACD in T1D, the purpose of this meta-analysis is to give an update and to study the differences in children and adults and to analyse the T1DACD contributing factors.Methods Two electronic databases were consulted: Pubmed and ISI Web of Knowledge. Literature until the end of 2012 was included. Effect sizes (Cohen's d), which are the standardized differences between the experimental and the control group, were calculated.ResultsSignificant findings of this study is a small to modest decrease in cognitive performance in T1D patients compared to non-diabetic controls. Children with T1D performed worse while testing for the executive function, full IQ and motor speed while T1D adults performed worse while testing the full/verbal and performance IQ, part of the executive function, memory, spatial memory and motor speed. Episodes of severe hypoglycaemia, chronic hyperglycaemia and age of onset can be significant influencing factors on the cognitive function in T1D.Conclusions This review adds that T1DACD is more severe in adults compared to children, suggesting that age and diabetes duration contribute to this T1DACD.
    Journal of Diabetes 07/2014; 6(6). DOI:10.1111/1753-0407.12193 · 2.35 Impact Factor