Article

Cognition and brain imaging in type 1 diabetes

Joslin Diabetes Center, 1 Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
Current Diabetes Reports (Impact Factor: 3.38). 05/2008; 8(2):132-7. DOI: 10.1007/s11892-008-0024-z
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Type 1 diabetes has mild effects on cognition that are influenced by age of onset, hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemic episodes. Some of these changes occur quite early in the disease course. Studies using relatively new brain imaging techniques have also shown brain changes in adults and children that appear to be influenced by metabolic abnormalities present in diabetes. Early detections of brain changes may be early indicators of subsequent cognitive abnormalities.

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