Article

Effect of green tea extract on obese women: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

Community Medicine Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) (Impact Factor: 3.94). 06/2008; 27(3):363-70. DOI: 10.1016/j.clnu.2008.03.007
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To examine the effect of green tea extract (GTE) on obese women and to explore the relationship between GTE and obesity-related hormone peptides.
A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted from July 2006 to June 2007 in Taipei Hospital, Taiwan. Seventy-eight of 100 obese women aged between 16 and 60 years with BMI>27 kg/m(2) and who had not received any other weight control maneuvers within the last 3 months completed this study. The subjects were randomly divided into Groups A and B. Group A (n=41) received GTE while Group B (n=37) took cellulose as a placebo, one capsule (400mg) three times each day for 12 weeks. The body weight (BW), body mass index (BMI) and waist circumflex (WC) were measured at the beginning of the study and after 12 weeks of treatment with GTE. The data were compared and expressed as % reduction.
There was only a 0.3% reduction in BW (0.15 kg) after 12 weeks of treatment with GTE. There was no statistical difference in % reduction in BW, BMI and WC between the GTE and placebo groups. Within group comparison revealed that the GTE group had significant reduction in LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride, and marked increase in the level of HDL-cholesterol, adiponectin and ghrelin. On the other hand, the placebo group showed significant reduction in triglyceride only, and a marked increase in the level of ghrelin alone.
This study showed no statistical difference in % reduction in BW, BMI and WC between the GTE and placebo groups after 12 weeks of treatment. The intake of GTE (491 mg catechins containing 302 mg EGCG) for 12 weeks is considered safe as shown by the results.

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    • "While the amount of daily tea and/or coffee intake was restricted in 14 RCTs, subjects in one RCT did not have restrictions to the amount of tea or caffeine [57]. The control for habitual tea or coffee intake was not specified in five RCTs [44] [45] [52] [53] [61]. "
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    • "On the one hand, Basu et al. [14] demonstrated that green tea extracts and beverages could cause reduction of body weight and body mass index in obese subjects in 8 weeks. On the other hand, in our previous study [15] we found that daily consumption of green tea extract containing 491 mg of catechins (302 mg EGCG) did not produce weight reduction in obese women, although significantly decreased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides were observed. Therefore, in this study we increased the concentration of EGCG to a daily dosage of 856.8 mg to examine the antiobestic effect of higher dosages of EGCG and to examine the effect of high-dosage GTE on obesity-related hormone peptides. "
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the effect and safety of high-dose green tea extract (Epigallocatechin gallate, EGCG) at a daily dosage of 856.8 mg on weight reduction and changes of lipid profile and obesity-related hormone peptides in women with central obesity. We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier no. NCT02147041. A total of 115 women with central obesity were screened at our clinic. 102 of them with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 27 kg/m(2) and a waist circumference (WC) ≥ 80 cm were eligible for the study. These women were randomly assigned to either a high-dose green tea group or placebo group. The total treatment time was 12 weeks. The main outcome measures were anthropometric measurements, lipid profiles, and obesity related hormone peptides including leptin, adiponectin, ghrelin, and insulin. Significant weight loss, from 76.8 ± 11.3 kg to 75.7 ± 11.5 kg (p = 0.025), as well as decreases in BMI (p = 0.018) and waist circumference (p = 0.023) were observed in the treatment group after 12 weeks of high-dose EGCG treatment. This study also demonstrated a consistent trend of decreased total cholesterol, reaching 5.33%, and decreased LDL plasma levels. There was good tolerance of the treatment among subjects without any side effects or adverse events. Significantly lower ghrelin levels and elevated adiponectin levels were detected in the study group than in the placebo group. 12 weeks of treatment with high-dose green tea extract resulted in significant weight loss, reduced waist circumference, and a consistent decrease in total cholesterol and LDL plasma levels without any side effects or adverse effects in women with central obesity. The antiobestic mechanism of high-dose green tea extract might be associated in part with ghrelin secretion inhibition, leading to increased adiponectin levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.
    Clinical Nutrition 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.clnu.2015.05.003 · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    • "While the amount of daily tea and/or coffee intake was restricted in 14 RCTs, subjects in one RCT did not have restrictions to the amount of tea or caffeine [57]. The control for habitual tea or coffee intake was not specified in five RCTs [44] [45] [52] [53] [61]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Many different dietary supplements are currently marketed for the management of hypertension, but the evidence for effectiveness is mixed. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence for or against the effectiveness of green tea (Camellia sinensis) on blood pressure and lipid parameters. Methods Electronic searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, Amed, Cinahl and the Cochrane Library to identify relevant human randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Hand searches of bibliographies were also conducted. The reporting quality of included studies was assessed using a checklist adapted from the CONSORT Statement. Two reviewers independently determined eligibility, assessed the reporting quality of the included studies, and extracted the data. Results 474 citations were identified and 20 RCTs comprising 1,536 participants were included. There were variations in the designs of the RCTs. A meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure favouring green tea (MD: -1.94 mmHg; 95% CI: -2.95 to -0.93; I2=8%; p = 0.0002). Similar results were also observed for total cholesterol (MD: -0.13 mmol/l; 95% CI: -0.2 to -0.07; I2=8%; p < 0.0001) and LDL cholesterol (MD: -0.19 mmol/l; 95% CI: -0.3 to -0.09; I2=70%; p = 0.0004). Adverse events included rash, elevated blood pressure, and abdominal discomfort. Conclusion Green tea intake results in significant reductions in systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. The effect size on systolic blood pressure is small, but the effects on total and LDL cholesterol appear moderate. Longer-term independent clinical trials evaluating the effects of green tea are warranted.
    Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases: NMCD 08/2014; 24(8). DOI:10.1016/j.numecd.2014.01.016 · 3.88 Impact Factor
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