Article

S6K1 phosphorylates and regulates fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) with the neuronal protein synthesis-dependent mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade

Department of Human Genetics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.
Journal of Biological Chemistry (Impact Factor: 4.6). 08/2008; 283(27):18478-82. DOI: 10.1074/jbc.C800055200
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Fragile X syndrome is a common form of cognitive deficit caused by the functional absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a dendritic RNA-binding protein that represses translation of specific messages. Although FMRP is phosphorylated in a group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activity-dependent manner following brief protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated dephosphorylation, the kinase regulating FMRP function in neuronal protein synthesis is unclear. Here we identify ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) as a major FMRP kinase in the mouse hippocampus, finding that activity-dependent phosphorylation of FMRP by S6K1 requires signaling inputs from mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ERK1/2, and PP2A. Further, the loss of hippocampal S6K1 and the subsequent absence of phospho-FMRP mimic FMRP loss in the increased expression of SAPAP3, a synapse-associated FMRP target mRNA. Together these data reveal a S6K1-PP2A signaling module regulating FMRP function and place FMRP phosphorylation in the mGluR-triggered signaling cascade required for protein-synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity.

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