Article

Multiple roles for lipids in the Hedgehog signalling pathway

Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstrasse 108, 01307 Dresden, Germany.
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology (Impact Factor: 36.46). 07/2008; 9(6):437-45. DOI: 10.1038/nrm2414
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The identification of endogenous sterol derivatives that modulate the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway has begun to suggest testable hypotheses for the cellular biological functions of Patched, and for the lipoprotein association of Hh. Progress in the field of intracellular sterol trafficking has emphasized how tightly the distribution of intracellular sterol is controlled, and suggests that the synthesis of sterol derivatives can be influenced by specific sterol-delivery pathways. The combination of this field with Hh studies will rapidly give us a more sophisticated understanding of both the Hh signal-transduction pathway and the cell biology of sterol metabolism.

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