Article

Supportive care needs of men living with prostate cancer in England: a survey.

King's College London, Division of Health and Social Care Research, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing Midwifery, 5th Floor, Waterloo Bridge Wing, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE19NN, UK.
British Journal of Cancer (Impact Factor: 5.08). 07/2008; 98(12):1903-9. DOI: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6604406
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Men with prostate cancer have various treatment options depending upon their stage of disease, age and presence of comorbidity. However, these treatments typically induce side effects, which generate currently ill-defined supportive care needs. This study examined the supportive care needs of men with prostate cancer within England. A postal questionnaire survey was conducted in six acute NHS Trusts. Seven hundred and forty-one men with prostate cancer participated. They had been diagnosed 3-24 months prior to the survey and had received various treatments. Men surveyed had specific and significant unmet supportive care needs. Areas of greatest need are related to psychological distress, sexuality-related issues and management of enduring lower urinary tract symptoms. High levels of psychological distress were reported, and those reporting psychological distress reported greater unmet supportive care needs. Unmet sexuality-related need was highest in younger men following radical prostatectomy. Lower urinary tract symptoms were almost universal in the sample. Perceived quality of life varied; men unsure of their remission status reported lowest quality of life. Psychological distress impacts significantly on perceived unmet need and is currently not being assessed or managed well in men living with prostate cancer in England.

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