Septicemic plague in a community hospital in California.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.
The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene (Impact Factor: 2.7). 07/2008; 78(6):868-71.
Source: PubMed


Diagnosis of a case of septicemic plague acquired in rural California was delayed because of a series of confounding events, resulting in concern about reliance on community hospitals as sentinels for detecting potential bioterrorism-related events. An epizootic study confirmed the peridomestic source of Yersinia pestis infection.

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Available from: Joseph M Vinetz, Oct 07, 2015
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