Article

Impact of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors on mitochondrial DNA and RNA in human skeletal muscle cells

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0672, USA.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (Impact Factor: 4.45). 07/2008; 52(8):2825-30. DOI: 10.1128/AAC.00434-08
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We previously reported that 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (didanosine, or ddI) significantly altered mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected children who had undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA for more than 2 years while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. This research examines the in vitro effects of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) on mitochondria of human skeletal muscle cells (HSMCs), including myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. mtDNA, mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA), and mRNA levels for nuclear mitochondrial regulatory factors were quantified in vitro using HSMCs, including myoblasts and differentiated myotubes, treated with NRTIs singly and in combination. After 5 days of treatment, mtDNA was significantly decreased in myoblasts and myotubes treated with ddI (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively) and ddI-containing regimens (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively) compared to levels in untreated cells. mtRNA (MTCYB) was also significantly decreased in the myoblasts and myotubes treated with ddI (P = 0.004) and ddI-containing regimens (P < 0.001). Regardless of the NRTI regimens examined, NRTI combinations significantly decreased mtRNA (MTCO3) in myoblasts and myotubes (P = 0.02 and P = 0.01, respectively). No significant differences were observed for nuclear mitochondrial regulatory factor mRNA in myoblasts or myotubes when treated with NRTIs (P > 0.07). ddI and ddI-containing regimens significantly decrease mtDNA and mtRNA in HSMCs, most notably in myoblasts. These findings may be of particular importance in developing countries, where ddI is widely used for first-line treatment of HIV-infected children.

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