Article

Classification of HLA-Matching for Retrospective Analysis of Unrelated Donor Transplantation: Revised Definitions to Predict Survival

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA.
Biology of blood and marrow transplantation: journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (Impact Factor: 3.35). 08/2008; 14(7):748-58. DOI: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2008.04.003
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The best unrelated donors (URD) for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are alleles matched at HLA-A, -B, -C, and DRB1. Earlier studies mostly used incomplete or lower resolution HLA typing for analysis of transplant outcome. To understand the impact of incomplete HLA characterization, we analyzed 14,797 URD HCT (1995-2006) using multivariable regression modeling adjusting for factors affecting survival. Of 21 matching cohorts, we identified 3 groups with significantly different outcomes. Well-matched cases had either no identified HLA mismatch and informative data at 4 loci or allele matching at HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 (n = 7477, 50% of the population). Partially matched pairs had a defined, single-locus mismatch and/or missing HLA data (n = 4962, 34%). Mismatched cases had > or =2 allele or antigen mismatches (n = 2358, 16%). Multivariate adjusted 5-year survival estimates were: well-matched: 54.1 (95% confidence interval), 52.9-55.4), partially matched: 43.7 (42.3-45.2), and mismatched: 33.4 (32.5-36.5), P < .001. A better matched donor yielded 10%-11% better 5-year survival. Importantly, intermediate resolution -A, -B, and -DRB1 alleles matched "6/6 antigen matched" HCT had survival outcomes within the partially matched cohort. We suggest that these proposed HLA subgroupings be used when complete HLA typing is not available. This improved categorization of HLA matching status allows adjustment for donor-recipient HLA compatibility, and can standardize interpretations of prior URD HCT experience.

0 Followers
 · 
134 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is the sixth special report that the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation regularly publishes on the current practice and indications for haematopoietic SCT for haematological diseases, solid tumours and immune disorders in Europe. Major changes have occurred in the field of haematopoietic SCT over the last years. Cord blood units as well as haploidentical donors have been increasingly used as stem cell sources for allo-SCT, thus, augmenting the possibility of finding a suitable donor for a patient. Continuous refinement of conditioning strategies has also expanded not only the number of potential indications but also has permitted consideration of older patients or those with co-morbidity for a transplant. There is accumulating evidence of the role of haematopoietic SCT in non-haematological disorders such as autoimmune diseases. On the other hand, the advent of new drugs and very effective targeted therapy has challenged the role of SCT in some instances or at least, modified its position in the treatment armamentarium of a given patient. An updated report with revised tables and operating definitions is presented.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 23 March 2015; doi:10.1038/bmt.2015.6.
    Bone marrow transplantation 03/2015; DOI:10.1038/bmt.2015.6 · 3.47 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although transplant practices have changed over the last decades there is no information on trends in incidence and outcome of cGVHD over time. This study utilized the central database of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) to describe the time trends for cGVHD incidence, non-relapse mortality, and the risk factors for cGVHD. The 12-year period was divided into three intervals: 1995-1999, 2000-2003, 2004-2007, and included 26,563 patients with acute leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. In the multivariate analysis, the incidence of cGVHD was shown to be increased in more recent years (odds ratio= 1.19, p<0.0001) and this trend was still seen when adjusting for donor type, graft type, or conditioning intensity. In patients with cGVHD, non-relapse mortality has decreased over time, but at 5-years there were no significant differences among different time periods. Risk factors for cGVHD were in line with previous studies. This is the first comprehensive characterization of the trends in cGVHD incidence and underscores the mounting need for addressing this major late complication of transplantation in future research. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Biology of blood and marrow transplantation: journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation 10/2014; 21(2). DOI:10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.10.021 · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) remains a major therapeutic challenge. We studied outcomes of 1788 AML patients relapsing after alloHCT (1990 to 2010) during first or second complete remission (CR) to identify factors associated with longer postrelapse survival. Median time to post-HCT relapse was 7 months (range, 1 to 177). At relapse, 1231 patients (69%) received intensive therapy, including chemotherapy alone (n = 660), donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) ± chemotherapy (n = 202), or second alloHCT ± chemotherapy ± DLI (n = 369), with subsequent CR rates of 29%. Median follow-up after relapse was 39 months (range, <1 to 193). Survival for all patients was 23% at 1 year after relapse; however, 3-year overall survival correlated with time from HCT to relapse (4% for relapse during the 1- to 6-month period, 12% during the 6-month to 2-year period, 26% during the 2- to 3-year period, and 38% for ≥3 years). In multivariable analysis, lower mortality was significantly associated with longer time from alloHCT to relapse (relative risk, .55 for 6 months to 2 years; relative risk, .39 for 2 to 3 years; and relative risk, .28 for ≥3 years; P < .0001) and a first HCT using reduced-intensity conditioning (relative risk, .77; 95% confidence interval [CI], .66 to .88; P = .0002). In contrast, inferior survival was associated with age >40 years (relative risk, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.24 to 1.64; P < .0001), active graft-versus-host disease at relapse (relative risk, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.39; P < .0001), adverse cytogenetics (relative risk, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.71; P = .0062), mismatched unrelated donor (relative risk, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.13; P = .0008), and use of cord blood for first HCT (relative risk, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.42; P = .0078). AML relapse after alloHCT predicted poor survival; however, patients who relapsed ≥6 months after their initial alloHCT had better survival and may benefit from intensive therapy, such as second alloHCT ± DLI. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Biology of blood and marrow transplantation: journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation 11/2014; 21(3). DOI:10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.11.007 · 3.35 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
35 Downloads
Available from
May 21, 2014