Article

Psychiatric genetics: progress amid controversy.

Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, University of Michigan, 5061 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2200, USA.
Nature Reviews Genetics (Impact Factor: 39.79). 08/2008; 9(7):527-40. DOI: 10.1038/nrg2381
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Several psychiatric disorders--such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and autism--are highly heritable, yet identifying their genetic basis has been challenging, with most discoveries failing to be replicated. However, inroads have been made by the incorporation of intermediate traits (endophenotypes) and of environmental factors into genetic analyses, and through the identification of rare inherited variants and novel structural mutations. Current efforts aim to increase sample sizes by gathering larger samples for case-control studies or through meta-analyses of such studies. More attention on unique families, rare variants, and on incorporating environment and the emerging knowledge of biological function and pathways into genetic analysis is warranted.

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