Article

The Use of Mosquito Nets and the Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum Infection in Rural South Central Somalia

Malaria Public Health & Epidemiology Group, Centre for Geographic Medicine Research-Coast, Kenya Medical Research Institute/Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Nairobi, Kenya.
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.23). 05/2008; 3(5):e2081. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002081
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT There have been resurgent efforts in Africa to estimate the public health impact of malaria control interventions such as insecticide treated nets (ITNs) following substantial investments in scaling-up coverage in the last five years. Little is known, however, on the effectiveness of ITN in areas of Africa that support low transmission. This hinders the accurate estimation of impact of ITN use on disease burden and its cost-effectiveness in low transmission settings.
Using a stratified two-stage cluster sample design, four cross-sectional studies were undertaken between March-June 2007 across three livelihood groups in an area of low intensity malaria transmission in South Central Somalia. Information on bed net use; age; and sex of all participants were recorded. A finger prick blood sample was taken from participants to examine for parasitaemia. Mantel-Haenzel methods were used to measure the effect of net use on parasitaemia adjusting for livelihood; age; and sex. A total of 10,587 individuals of all ages were seen of which 10,359 provided full information. Overall net use and parasite prevalence were 12.4% and 15.7% respectively. Age-specific protective effectiveness (PE) of bed net ranged from 39% among <5 years to 72% among 5-14 years old. Overall PE of bed nets was 54% (95% confidence interval 44%-63%) after adjusting for livelihood; sex; and age.
Bed nets confer high protection against parasite infection in South Central Somalia. In such areas where baseline transmission is low, however, the absolute reductions in parasitaemia due to wide-scale net use will be relatively small raising questions on the cost-effectiveness of covering millions of people living in such settings in Africa with nets. Further understanding of the progress of disease upon infection against the cost of averting its consequent burden in low transmission areas of Africa is therefore required.

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    • "This suggesting other malaria prevention activities/products appeared to substitute for nets rather than complements. The finding of higher net use in households living adjacent to rivers or streams than their counterparts is in agreement with a study [47]. Thus, households with increased risk of getting malaria are more aware of the increased risk and more inclined to use protective measures. "
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    BMC Public Health 01/2014; 14(1):99. DOI:10.1186/1471-2458-14-99 · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    • "Second, malaria prevalence was significantly higher in the northern and eastern subdistricts that are located in the hilly areas bordering Myanmar and Rangamati, another endemic district, whereas endemicity was lower in western and southern subdistricts in or close to the coastal plains, which are more accessible and where access to health care facilities is better. The collected data indicate a level of malaria transmission similar to some African countries, such as Gabon [21], Somalia [40] or Mozambique [41]. Previous studies from India and Indonesia also detected similar parasite prevalence rates [42,43]. "
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