Article

Anorexia nervosa trios: behavioral profiles of individuals with anorexia nervosa and their parents.

University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Eating Disorders Treatment and Research Center, La Jolla, CA, USA.
Psychological Medicine (Impact Factor: 5.43). 07/2008; 39(3):451-61. DOI: 10.1017/S0033291708003826
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with behavioral traits that predate the onset of AN and persist after recovery. We identified patterns of behavioral traits in AN trios (proband plus two biological parents).
A total of 433 complete trios were collected in the Price Foundation Genetic Study of AN using standardized instruments for eating disorder (ED) symptoms, anxiety, perfectionism, and temperament. We used latent profile analysis and ANOVA to identify and validate patterns of behavioral traits.
We distinguished three classes with medium to large effect sizes by mothers' and probands' drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, neuroticism, trait anxiety, and harm avoidance. Fathers did not differ significantly across classes. Classes were distinguished by degree of symptomatology rather than qualitative differences. Class 1 (approximately 33%) comprised low symptom probands and mothers with scores in the healthy range. Class 2 ( approximately 43%) included probands with marked elevations in drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, neuroticism, trait anxiety, and harm avoidance and mothers with mild anxious/perfectionistic traits. Class 3 (approximately 24%) included probands and mothers with elevations on ED and anxious/perfectionistic traits. Mother-daughter symptom severity was related in classes 1 and 3 only. Trio profiles did not differ significantly by proband clinical status or subtype.
A key finding is the importance of mother and daughter traits in the identification of temperament and personality patterns in families affected by AN. Mother-daughter pairs with severe ED and anxious/perfectionistic traits may represent a more homogeneous and familial variant of AN that could be of value in genetic studies.

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