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Toy story: Why do monkey and human males prefer trucks? Comment on "Sex differences in rhesus monkey toy preferences parallel those of children" by Hassett, Siebert and Wallen

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
Hormones and Behavior (Impact Factor: 4.51). 06/2008; 54(3):355-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2008.05.003
Source: PubMed

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