Prepregnancy Obesity Prevalence in the United States, 2004–2005

Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.
Maternal and Child Health Journal (Impact Factor: 2.24). 08/2008; 13(5):614-20. DOI: 10.1007/s10995-008-0388-3
Source: PubMed


To provide a current estimate of the prevalence of prepregnancy obesity in the United States.
We analyzed 2004-2005 data from 26 states and New York City (n = 75,403 women) participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, an ongoing, population-based surveillance system that collects information on maternal behaviors associated with pregnancy. Information was obtained from questionnaires self-administered after delivery or from linked birth certificates; prepregnancy body mass index was based on self-reported weight and height. Data were weighted to provide representative estimates of all women delivering a live birth in each particular state.
In this study, about one in five women who delivered were obese; in some state, race/ethnicity, and Medicaid status subgroups, the prevalence was as high as one-third. State-specific prevalence varied widely and ranged from 13.9 to 25.1%. Black women had an obesity prevalence about 70% higher than white and Hispanic women (black: 29.1%; white: 17.4%; Hispanic: 17.4%); however, these race-specific rates varied notably by location. Obesity prevalence was 50% higher among women whose delivery was paid for by Medicaid than by other means (e.g., private insurance, cash, HMO).
This prevalence makes maternal obesity and its resulting maternal morbidities (e.g., gestational diabetes mellitus) a common risk factor for a complicated pregnancy.

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    • "1 in 5 women who deliver in the US are obese [1]. The offspring of these women have a higher risk of developing obesity and insulin resistance and dying of cardiovascular disease in later life [2e4]. "
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Adequate maternal supply and placental delivery of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) is essential for normal fetal development. In humans, maternal obesity alters placental FA uptake, though the impact of diet remains uncertain. The fatty fetal liver observed in offspring of Japanese macaques fed a high fat diet (HFD) was prevented with resveratrol supplementation during pregnancy. We sought to determine the effect of HFD and resveratrol, a supplement with insulin-sensitizing properties, on placental LCPUFA uptake in this model. METHODS: J. macaques were fed control chow (15% fat, n = 5), HFD (35% fat, n = 10) or HFD containing 0.37% resveratrol (n = 5) prior to- and throughout pregnancy. At ∼130d gestation (term = 173d), placentas were collected by caesarean section. Fatty acid uptake studies using (14)C-labeled oleic acid, arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) were performed in placental explants. RESULTS: Resveratrol supplementation increased placental uptake of DHA (P < 0.05), while HFD alone had no measurable effect. Resveratrol increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity and mRNA expression of the fatty acid transporters FATP-4, CD36 and FABPpm (P < 0.05). Placental DHA content was decreased in HFD dams; resveratrol had no effect on tissue fatty acid profiles. DISCUSSION: Maternal HFD did not significantly affect placental LCPUFA uptake. Furthermore, resveratrol stimulated placental DHA uptake capacity, AMPK activation and transporter expression. Placental handling of DHA is particularly sensitive to the dramatic alterations in the maternal metabolic phenotype and placental AMPK activity associated with resveratrol supplementation.
    Placenta 06/2015; 36(8):903-10. DOI:10.1016/j.placenta.2015.06.002 · 2.71 Impact Factor
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    • "In the context of the national obesity epidemic, 1 in 5 pregnant women in the US is obese [1]. Pregnancies among obese women are considered high-risk because they are associated with maternal morbidities including hypertensive and thromboembolic disorders, infection, and gestational diabetes [2]. "
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the association between prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) is associated with early vs. late and medically-induced vs. spontaneous preterm birth (PTB) subtypes. Using data from the Boston Birth Cohort, we examined associations of prepregnancy BMI with 189 early (<34 completed weeks) and 277 late (34-36 completed weeks) medically-induced PTBs and 320 early and 610 late spontaneous PTBs vs. 3281 term births (37-44 weeks) in multinomial regression. To assess for mediation by important pregnancy complications, we performed sequential models with and without hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, chorioamnionitis, and gestational diabetes. Prevalence of prepregnancy obesity (BMI >= 30.0 kg/m2) was 28% among mothers with medically-induced PTBs, 18% among mothers with spontaneous PTBs, and 18% among mothers with term births (p = <0.001). After adjustment for demographic and known risk factors for PTB, prepregnancy obesity was associated with higher odds of both early [OR 1.78 (1.19, 2.66)] and late [OR 1.49 (1.09, 2.04)] medically-induced PTB. These effect estimates were attenuated with inclusion of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes. For spontaneous deliveries, prepregnancy obesity was associated with decreased odds of PTB (0.76 [0.58, 0.98]) and underweight was nearly associated with increased odds of PTB (1.46 [0.99, 2.16]). Prepregnancy obesity is associated with higher risk of medically-induced, but not spontaneous PTB. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes appear to partially explain the association between prepregnancy obesity and early and late medically-induced PTB.
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 04/2014; 14(1):153. DOI:10.1186/1471-2393-14-153 · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    • "Overweight and obesity are increasingly common in the obstetric population, affecting up to one-third of childbearing women in developed countries [2] [3] [13]. Maternal obesity is a major independent risk factor for numerous pregnancy and neonatal complications, some of which predispose the baby to disease in adulthood. "
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity in the childbearing population is increasingly common. Obesity is associated with increased risk for a number of maternal and neonatal pregnancy complications. Some of these complications, such as gestational diabetes, are risk factors for long-term disease in both mother and baby. While clinical practice guidelines advocate for healthy weight prior to pregnancy, there is not a clear directive for achieving healthy weight before conception. There are known benefits to even moderate weight loss prior to pregnancy, but there are potential adverse effects of restricted nutrition during the periconceptional period. Epidemiological and animal studies point to differences in offspring conceived during a time of maternal nutritional restriction. These include changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function, body composition, glucose metabolism, and cardiovascular function. The periconceptional period is therefore believed to play an important role in programming offspring physiological function and is sensitive to nutritional insult. This review summarizes the evidence to date for offspring programming as a result of maternal periconception weight loss. Further research is needed in humans to clearly identify benefits and potential risks of losing weight in the months before conceiving. This may then inform us of clinical practice guidelines for optimal approaches to achieving a healthy weight before pregnancy.
    Journal of obesity 04/2014; 2014(2):204295. DOI:10.1155/2014/204295
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