Article

European Society of Hypertension guidelines for blood pressure monitoring at home: a summary report of the Second International Consensus Conference on Home Blood Pressure Monitoring.

Department of Clinical Medicine and Prevention, University of Milano-Bicocca
Journal of Hypertension (Impact Factor: 4.22). 09/2008; 26(8):1505-26. DOI: 10.1097/HJH.0b013e328308da66
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This document summarizes the available evidence and provides recommendations on the use of home blood pressure monitoring in clinical practice and in research. It updates the previous recommendations on the same topic issued in year 2000. The main topics addressed include the methodology of home blood pressure monitoring, its diagnostic and therapeutic thresholds, its clinical applications in hypertension, with specific reference to special populations, and its applications in research. The final section deals with the problems related to the implementation of these recommendations in clinical practice.

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