A dietary pattern derived to correlate with estrogens and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer

Department of Nutrition, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment (Impact Factor: 3.94). 01/2012; 132(3):1157-62. DOI: 10.1007/s10549-011-1942-z
Source: PubMed


Circulating estrogens are an established risk factor for breast cancer and some data suggest that diet may influence estrogen levels. Therefore, using a subsample (n = 550) of women from a large cohort, we applied reduced rank regression to identify a dietary pattern that was correlated with estradiol and estrone sulfate. We then adapted the pattern to be used with the full cohort (n = 67,802) and prospectively assessed its association with postmenopausal breast cancer. The estrogen food pattern, characterized by higher intakes of red meat, legumes, and pizza, but lower intakes of coffee and whole grains, was modestly but significantly correlated with estradiol (r = 0.14) and estrone sulfate (r = 0.20). During 22 years of follow-up, we ascertained 4,596 incident breast cancer, with 2,938 estrogen receptor-positive tumors and 689 estrogen receptor-negative tumors. However, after adjusting for potential confounders, we did not observe any association with overall estrogen receptor-positive or estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer. In conclusion, diet pattern appeared to only have modest association with estrogens, and was not associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Although these results were null, it should be repeated in other populations as differences in food intake may yield a dietary pattern with stronger association with estrogens.

18 Reads
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A connection between dietary factors and endometriosis onset has become a topic of interest mostly due to the observation that physiological and pathological processes of the disease can be influenced by diet. This paper systematically reviews prior publications dealing with this aspect in order to identify potentially modifiable risk factors. Comprehensive searches in the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded were conducted to identify published studies evaluating the association between food intake ( nutrients and food groups) and endometriosis. Eleven studies were identified: 10 case-control and one cohort study. Information on diet was collected using food frequency questionnaires in seven studies, while in one study the questionnaire focused on caffeine and alcohol intake. Women with endometriosis seem to consume fewer vegetables and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and more red meat, coffee and trans fats but these findings could not be consistently replicated. Most data have also been discussed herein in light of the available experimental and animal model results. At present, evidence supporting a significant association between diet and endometriosis is equivocal. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of diet on endometriosis risk and progression.
    Reproductive biomedicine online 01/2013; 26(4). DOI:10.1016/j.rbmo.2012.12.011 · 3.02 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dysregulated miRNA expression has been associated with the development and progression of cancers, including breast cancer. The role of estrogen (E2) in regulation of cell proliferation and breast carcinogenesis is well-known. Recent reports have associated several miRNAs with estrogen receptors in breast cancers. Investigation of the regulatory role of miRNAs is critical for understanding the effect of E2 in human breast cancer, as well as for developing strategies for cancer chemoprevention. In the present study we used the well-established ACI rat model that develops mammary tumors upon E2 exposure and identified a 'signature' of 33 significantly modulated miRNAs during the process of mammary tumorigenesis. Several of these miRNAs were altered as early as 3 weeks after initial E2 treatment and their modulation persisted throughout the mammary carcinogenesis process, suggesting that these molecular changes are early events. Furthermore, ellagic acid, which inhibited E2-induced mammary tumorigenesis in our previous study, reversed the dysregulation of miR-375, miR-206, miR-182, miR-122, miR-127 and miR-183 detected with E2 treatment and modulated their target proteins (ERα, cyclin D1, RASD1, FoxO3a, FoxO1, cyclin G1, Bcl-w and Bcl-2). This is the first systematic study examining the changes in miRNA expression associated with E2 treatment in ACI rats as early as 3 week until tumor time point. The effect of a chemopreventive agent, ellagic acid in reversing miRNAs modulated during E2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis was also established. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the new molecular events behind the chemoprevention action of ellagic acid in and treatment of breast cancer.
    Cancer letters 06/2013; 339(2). DOI:10.1016/j.canlet.2013.06.012 · 5.62 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background/objective: Serum metabolites have been linked to higher risk of chronic diseases but determinants of serum metabolites are not clear. We aimed to investigate the association between habitual diet as a modifiable risk factor and relevant serum metabolites. Subjects/methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 2380 EPIC-Potsdam participants. Intake of 45 food groups was assessed by food frequency questionnaire and concentrations of 127 serum metabolites were measured by targeted metabolomics. Reduced rank regression was used to find dietary patterns that explain the maximum variation of metabolites. Results: In the multivariable-adjusted model, the proportion of explained variation by habitual diet was ranked as follows: acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines (5.7%), sphingomyelins (5.1%), diacyl-phosphatidylcholines (4.4%), lyso-phosphatidylcholines (4.1%), acylcarnitines (3.5%), amino acids (2.2%) and hexose (1.6%). A pattern with high intake of butter and low intake of margarine was related to acylcarnitines, acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, lyso-phosphatidylcholines and hydroxy-sphingomyelins, particularly with saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid side chains. A pattern with high intake of red meat and fish and low intake of whole-grain bread and tea was related to hexose and phosphatidylcholines. A pattern consisting of high intake of potatoes, dairy products and cornflakes particularly explained methionine and branched chain amino acids. Dietary patterns related to type 2 diabetes-relevant metabolites included high intake of red meat and low intake of whole-grain bread, tea, coffee, cake and cookies, canned fruits and fish. Conclusions: Dietary patterns characterized by intakes of red meat, whole-grain bread, tea and coffee were linked to relevant metabolites and could be potential targets for chronic disease prevention.
    European journal of clinical nutrition 08/2013; 67(10). DOI:10.1038/ejcn.2013.147 · 2.71 Impact Factor
Show more


18 Reads
Available from