Article

Roadmap and standard operating procedures for biobanking and discovery of neurochemical markers in ALS.

Department of Neurology, University of Ulm, Oberer Eselsberg 34, Ulm, Germany.
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Impact Factor: 3.4). 01/2012; 13(1):1-10.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Despite major advances in deciphering the neuropathological hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), validated neurochemical biomarkers for monitoring disease activity, earlier diagnosis, defining prognosis and unlocking key pathophysiological pathways are lacking. Although several candidate biomarkers exist, translation into clinical application is hindered by small sample numbers, especially longitudinal, for independent verification. This review considers the potential routes to the discovery of neurochemical markers in ALS, and provides a consensus statement on standard operating procedures that will facilitate multicenter collaboration, validation and ultimately clinical translation.

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