Article

Polarity sets the stage for cytokinesis.

Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA.
Molecular biology of the cell (Impact Factor: 5.98). 01/2012; 23(1):7-11. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E11-06-0512
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cell polarity is important for a number of processes, from chemotaxis to embryogenesis. Recent studies suggest a new role for polarity in the orchestration of events during the final cell separation step of cell division called abscission. Abscission shares several features with cell polarization, including rearrangement of phosphatidylinositols, reorganization of microtubules, and trafficking of exocyst-associated membranes. Here we focus on how the canonical pathways for cell polarization and cell migration may play a role in spatiotemporal membrane trafficking events required for the final stages of cytokinesis.

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