Article

Access to the Medical Record for Patients and Involved Providers: Transparency Through Electronic Tools

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston TX 77030, and University of Texas System, Austin, TX 78701.
Annals of internal medicine (Impact Factor: 16.1). 12/2011; 155(12):853-4. DOI: 10.1059/0003-4819-155-12-201112200-00010
Source: PubMed
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