Article

Stochastic oscillations in models of epidemics on a network of cities.

Centro de Física da Matéria Condensada and Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa Codex, Portugal.
Physical Review E (Impact Factor: 2.31). 11/2011; 84(5 Pt 1):051919. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.051919
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We carry out an analytic investigation of stochastic oscillations in a susceptible-infected-recovered model of disease spread on a network of n cities. In the model a fraction f(jk) of individuals from city k commute to city j, where they may infect, or be infected by, others. Starting from a continuous-time Markov description of the model the deterministic equations, which are valid in the limit when the population of each city is infinite, are recovered. The stochastic fluctuations about the fixed point of these equations are derived by use of the van Kampen system-size expansion. The fixed point structure of the deterministic equations is remarkably simple: A unique nontrivial fixed point always exists and has the feature that the fraction of susceptible, infected, and recovered individuals is the same for each city irrespective of its size. We find that the stochastic fluctuations have an analogously simple dynamics: All oscillations have a single frequency, equal to that found in the one-city case. We interpret this phenomenon in terms of the properties of the spectrum of the matrix of the linear approximation of the deterministic equations at the fixed point.

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