Article

Astrovirus MLB1 Is Not Associated with Diarrhea in a Cohort of Indian Children

University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.53). 12/2011; 6(12):e28647. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0028647
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Astroviruses are a known cause of human diarrhea. Recently the highly divergent astrovirus MLB1 (MLB1) was identified in a stool sample from a patient with diarrhea. It has subsequently been detected in stool from individuals with and without diarrhea. To determine whether MLB1 is associated with diarrhea, we conducted a case control study of MLB1. In parallel, the prevalence of the classic human astroviruses (HAstVs) was also determined in the same case control cohort. 400 cases and 400 paired controls from a longitudinal birth cohort in Vellore, India were analyzed by RT-PCR. While HAstVs were associated with diarrhea (p = 0.029) in this cohort, MLB1 was not; 14 of the controls and 4 cases were positive for MLB1. Furthermore, MLB1 viral load did not differ significantly between the cases and controls. The role of MLB1 in human health still remains unknown and future studies are needed.

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Available from: Priya Rajendran, Jul 25, 2014
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    • "Wider geographic sampling of human fecal samples will likely continue to increase the known diversity of human astroviruses. Case-control studies of unexplained diarrhea will help determine whether any of these novel astroviruses has pathogenic potential [25] although their occasional pathogenicity in highly susceptible individuals [20] such as immunosuppressed patients will remain a possibility irrespective of their associations or lack thereof with diarrhea or other enteric condition. The GenBank accession numbers for human astrovirus BF34 is KF859964. "
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