Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (Impact Factor: 5.2). 11/2012; 6(10). DOI: 10.1002/term.525
Source: PubMed


Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction, driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue but, due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation and unconstrained (i.e. not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate these three key factors in concert. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modelling studies. We then cultured cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channelled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After 8 days of culture, constructs grown with simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23 ± 0.10% vs 0.14 ± 0.05%, 0.13 ± 0.08% or 0.09 ± 0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization compared to control groups. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Available from: Jianwen Luo, Oct 09, 2015
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    • "In the light of these promising results, we also expected that direct perfusion of cells could promote the formation of a vascularized cardiac patch. In line with previous descriptions (Maidhof et al., 2012), we observed more uniform and dense spatial cell distribution in the scaffold, with cells migrating toward the substrate inner core under dynamic conditions. Thus we established a method for sequential cell seeding: gelatin scaffolds were colonized with hMSCs and maintained in static conditions for 4 days in order to favor the endothelialization of the substrate, then scaffolds were loaded with pre-committed GFP-positive cardiac progenitors and cultured in perfusion bioreactor for 1 week in the presence of cardiogenic medium. "
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    ABSTRACT: The vascularization of tissue engineered products represents a key issue in regenerative medicine which needs to be addressed before the translation of these protocols to the bedside can be foreseen. Here we propose a multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized three-dimensional (3D) cardiac bio-substitutes using dynamic cell cultures and highly porous biocompatible gelatin scaffolds. The strategy adopted exploits the peculiar differentiation potential of two distinct subsets of adult stem cells to obtain human vascularized 3D cardiac tissues. In the first step of the procedure, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are seeded onto gelatin scaffolds to provide interconnected vessel-like structures, while human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) are stimulated in vitro to obtain their commitment toward the cardiac phenotype. The use of a modular bioreactor allows the perfusion of the whole scaffold, providing superior performance in terms of cardiac tissue maturation and cell survival. Both the cell culture on natural-derived polymers and the continuous medium perfusion of the scaffold led to the formation of a densely packaged proto-tissue composed of vascular-like and cardiac-like cells, which might complete maturation process and interconnect with native tissue upon in vivo implantation. In conclusion, the data obtained through the approach here proposed highlight the importance to provide stem cells with complementary signals in vitro able to resemble the complexity of cardiac microenvironment.
    Frontiers in Physiology 06/2014; 5:210. DOI:10.3389/fphys.2014.00210 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    • "Recent microengineered cell culture systems have been focused on reproducing physiologically relevant dynamic microenvironments of specific tissues and organs. For instance, Maidhof et al. [32] developed a bio reactor that simultaneously provides two critical factors for the development of cardiac tissues: synchronous medium perfusion and tissue contraction driven by electrical stimulation. The simultaneous application of nutrient perfusion and electrical stimulation improved the differentiation of cardiac cells and their assembly into functional cardiac tissue constructs. "
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    ABSTRACT: Recent advances in integrating microengineering and tissue engineering have generated promising microengineered physiological models for experimental medicine and pharmaceutical research. Here we review the recent development of microengineered physiological systems, or also known as "ogans-on-chips", that reconstitute the physiologically critical features of specific human tissues and organs and their interactions. This technology uses microengineering approaches to construct organ-specific microenvironments, reconstituting tissue structures, tissue-tissue interactions and interfaces, and dynamic mechanical and biochemical stimuli found in specific organs, to direct cells to assemble into functional tissues. We first discuss microengineering approaches to reproduce the key elements of physiologically important, dynamic mechanical microenvironments, biochemical microenvironments, and microarchitectures of specific tissues and organs in microfluidic cell culture systems. This is followed by examples of microengineered individual organ models that incorporate the key elements of physiological microenvironments into single microfluidic cell culture systems to reproduce organ-level functions. Finally, microengineered multiple organ systems that simulate multiple organ interactions to better represent human physiology, including human responses to drugs, is covered in this review. This emerging organs-on-chips technology has the potential to become an alternative to 2D and 3D cell culture and animal models for experimental medicine, human disease modeling, drug development, and toxicology.
    Biotechnology Journal 01/2014; 9(1). DOI:10.1002/biot.201300187 · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    • "Recently, Maidhof et al. [63] asserted that fixing the cell constructs in place for perfusion culture is a severe limitation. Thus, they proposed the design of a bioreactor to deliver simultaneous culture medium perfusion and electrical stimulation during the culture of engineered cardiac constructs free of external fixation. "
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    ABSTRACT: Owing to the inability of self-replacement by a damaged myocardium, alternative strategies to heart transplantation have been explored within the last decades and cardiac tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is among the present challenges in biomedical research. Hopefully, several studies witness the constant extension of the toolbox available to engineer a fully functional, contractile, and robust cardiac tissue using different combinations of cells, template bioscaffolds, and biophysical stimuli obtained by the use of specific bioreactors. Mechanical forces influence the growth and shape of every tissue in our body generating changes in intracellular biochemistry and gene expression. That is why bioreactors play a central role in the task of regenerating a complex tissue such as the myocardium. In the last fifteen years a large number of dynamic culture devices have been developed and many results have been collected. The aim of this brief review is to resume in a single streamlined paper the state of the art in this field.
    07/2013; 2013(5):918640. DOI:10.1155/2013/918640
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