Article

Real-time remote monitoring of temperature and humidity within a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using flexible sensors.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
Sensors (Impact Factor: 2.05). 01/2011; 11(9):8674-84. DOI: 10.3390/s110908674
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study developed portable, non-invasive flexible humidity and temperature microsensors and an in situ wireless sensing system for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The system integrated three parts: a flexible capacitive humidity microsensor, a flexible resistive temperature microsensor, and a radio frequency (RF) module for signal transmission. The results show that the capacitive humidity microsensor has a high sensitivity of 0.83 pF%RH(-1) and the resistive temperature microsensor also exhibits a high sensitivity of 2.94 × 10(-3) °C(-1). The established RF module transmits the signals from the two microsensors. The transmission distance can reach 4 m and the response time is less than 0.25 s. The performance measurements demonstrate that the maximum power density of the fuel cell with and without these microsensors are 14.76 mW·cm(-2) and 15.90 mW·cm(-2), with only 7.17% power loss.

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