Pharmacokinetics and safety of a new paediatric fixed-dose combination of zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine in HIV-infected children

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
Antiviral therapy (Impact Factor: 3.02). 01/2011; 16(8):1287-95. DOI: 10.3851/IMP1931
Source: PubMed


Alternatives to the available stavudine-containing paediatric fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablets are rapidly needed due to concerns regarding the cumulative toxicity of long-term stavudine exposure. We report the bioavailability and short-term safety of a novel paediatric FDC tablet of zidovudine (ZDV)/lamivudine (3TC)/nevirapine (NVP; 30/15/28 mg) in HIV-infected children.
In this Phase I/II open-label pharmacokinetic study, 42 children weighing 6-30 kg treated with NVP-based HAART for ≥4 weeks were randomized to receive the FDC tablets (GPO-VIR Z30) or the liquid formulations. Dosing was weight-based. Intensive 12-h blood sampling was performed after 2 weeks; subjects then crossed-over to the alternate formulation at equal doses and sampling repeated 2 weeks later. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by non-compartmental analysis. Buccal-swab samples were collected for cytochrome P450 (CYP)2B6 polymorphism analysis.
With the FDC tablet, the geometric mean (90% CI) area under the curve (AUC) for ZDV, 3TC and NVP was 1.58 (1.49-1.68), 7.78 (7.38-8.19) and 68.88 (62.13-76.36) μg•h/ml, respectively. Rules for NVP therapeutic inadequacy were defined a priori, and despite lower NVP exposure with the tablet (P<0.001), the levels remained therapeutically adequate. ZDV AUC was similar between formulations. 3TC exposure was significantly higher with the tablet but comparable to historical data in adults and children taking branded tablets. While receiving the tablet, NVP AUC in children with CYP2B 516 GG (45%), GT (45%) and TT (10%) genotypes were 67.0, 74.5 and 106.4 μg•h/ml, respectively (P=0.04).
Disparities in drug exposure between formulations were observed; however, the FDC tablet delivered therapeutically adequate exposures of each drug and could well play an important role in simplifying antiretroviral treatment for children.

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Available from: Linda Aurpibul, May 25, 2015
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    • "First, specific medications, such as lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) and abacavir (ABC), may be preferred in guidelines for clinical reasons [9-12], but their costs remain higher as well. Second, fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) are widely used in many ART programs and often lead to substantial cost-savings compared to their individual component drugs, as well as dosing convenience and improved adherence [13-15]. The production of pediatric FDCs has improved drastically over the past few years, resulting in several dual and triple dispersible formulations [7,16]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Pediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been shown to substantially reduce morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected infants and children. To accurately project program costs, analysts need accurate estimations of antiretroviral drug (ARV) costs for children. However, the costing of pediatric antiretroviral therapy is complicated by weight-based dosing recommendations which change as children grow. Methods We developed a step-by-step methodology for estimating the cost of pediatric ARV regimens for children ages 0–13 years old. The costing approach incorporates weight-based dosing recommendations to provide estimated ARV doses throughout childhood development. Published unit drug costs are then used to calculate average monthly drug costs. We compared our derived monthly ARV costs to published estimates to assess the accuracy of our methodology. Results The estimates of monthly ARV costs are provided for six commonly used first-line pediatric ARV regimens, considering three possible care scenarios. The costs derived in our analysis for children were fairly comparable to or slightly higher than available published ARV drug or regimen estimates. Conclusions The methodology described here can be used to provide an accurate estimation of pediatric ARV regimen costs for cost-effectiveness analysts to project the optimum packages of care for HIV-infected children, as well as for program administrators and budget analysts who wish to assess the feasibility of increasing pediatric ART availability in constrained budget environments.
    BMC Health Services Research 05/2014; 14(1):201. DOI:10.1186/1472-6963-14-201 · 1.71 Impact Factor
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    The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 12/2011; 31(4):389-91. DOI:10.1097/INF.0b013e3182401c41 · 2.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The bioequivalence of formulations is usually evaluated in healthy adult volunteers. In our study in 19 HIV-1-infected Ugandan children (1.8-4 years of age, weight 12 to <15 kg) receiving zidovudine, lamivudine, and abacavir solutions twice a day for ≥24 weeks, the use of scored tablets allowed comparison of plasma pharmacokinetics of oral solutions vs. tablets. Samples were collected 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 h after each child's last morning dose of oral solution before changing to scored tablets of Combivir (coformulated zidovudine + lamivudine) and abacavir; this was repeated 4 weeks later. Dose-normalized area under curve (AUC)(0-12) and peak concentration (C(max)) for the tablet formulation were bioequivalent with those of the oral solution with respect to zidovudine and abacavir (e.g., dose-normalized geometric mean ratio (dnGMR) (tablet:solution) for zidovudine and abacavir AUC(0-12) were 1.01 (90% confidence interval (CI) 0.87-1.18) and 0.96 (0.83-1.12), respectively). However, lamivudine exposure was ~55% higher with the tablet formulation (AUC(0-12) dnGMR = 1.58 (1.37-1.81), C(max) dnGMR = 1.55 (1.33-1.81)). Although the clinical relevance of this finding is unclear, it highlights the impact of the formulation and the importance of conducting bioequivalence studies in target pediatric populations.
    Clinical Pharmacology &#38 Therapeutics 12/2011; 91(2):272-80. DOI:10.1038/clpt.2011.225 · 7.90 Impact Factor
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