Article

Adenovirus-associated virus vector-mediated gene transfer in hemophilia B.

Department of Haematology, University College London Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom.
New England Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 54.42). 12/2011; 365(25):2357-65. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1108046
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Hemophilia B, an X-linked disorder, is ideally suited for gene therapy. We investigated the use of a new gene therapy in patients with the disorder.
We infused a single dose of a serotype-8-pseudotyped, self-complementary adenovirus-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing a codon-optimized human factor IX (FIX) transgene (scAAV2/8-LP1-hFIXco) in a peripheral vein in six patients with severe hemophilia B (FIX activity, <1% of normal values). Study participants were enrolled sequentially in one of three cohorts (given a high, intermediate, or low dose of vector), with two participants in each group. Vector was administered without immunosuppressive therapy, and participants were followed for 6 to 16 months.
AAV-mediated expression of FIX at 2 to 11% of normal levels was observed in all participants. Four of the six discontinued FIX prophylaxis and remained free of spontaneous hemorrhage; in the other two, the interval between prophylactic injections was increased. Of the two participants who received the high dose of vector, one had a transient, asymptomatic elevation of serum aminotransferase levels, which was associated with the detection of AAV8-capsid-specific T cells in the peripheral blood; the other had a slight increase in liver-enzyme levels, the cause of which was less clear. Each of these two participants received a short course of glucocorticoid therapy, which rapidly normalized aminotransferase levels and maintained FIX levels in the range of 3 to 11% of normal values.
Peripheral-vein infusion of scAAV2/8-LP1-hFIXco resulted in FIX transgene expression at levels sufficient to improve the bleeding phenotype, with few side effects. Although immune-mediated clearance of AAV-transduced hepatocytes remains a concern, this process may be controlled with a short course of glucocorticoids without loss of transgene expression. (Funded by the Medical Research Council and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00979238.).

0 Bookmarks
 · 
373 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice.piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(8):e104957. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic disease caused by mutation of the gene for coagulation protein factor IX (FIX), with an incidence of approximately once every 30,000 male births in all populations and ethnic groups. When severe, the disease leads to spontaneous life threatening bleeding episodes. When untreated, most patients die from bleeding complications before 25 years of age. Current therapy requires frequent intravenous infusions of therapeutic recombinant or plasma-derived protein concentrates containing FIX. Most patients administer the infusions at home every few days, and must limit their physical activities to avoid abnormal bleeding when the FIX activity levels are below normal. After completing the pivotal Phase III clinical trial, a new therapeutic FIX preparation that has been engineered for an extended half-life in circulation, received regulatory approval in March 2014 in Canada and the US. This new FIX represents a major therapeutic advance for patients with hemophilia B. The half-life is prolonged due to fusion of the native FIX molecule with the normal constant region of immunoglobulin G. This fusion molecule then follows the normal immunoglobulin recirculation pathways through endothelial cells, resulting in prolonged times in circulation. In the clinical trials, over 150 patients successfully used eftrenonacog alfa regularly for more than 1 year to prevent spontaneous bleeding, to successfully treat any bleeding episodes, and to provide effective coagulation for major surgery. All infusions were well tolerated and effective, with no inhibitors detected and no safety concerns. This promising therapy should allow patients to use fewer infusions to maintain appropriate FIX activity levels in all clinical settings.
    Patient Preference and Adherence 01/2014; 8:1073-83. · 1.33 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cochlear implants have provided hearing to hundreds of thousands of profoundly deaf people around the world. Recently, the eligibility criteria for cochlear implantation have been relaxed to include individuals who have some useful residual hearing. These recipients receive inputs from both electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS). Implant recipients who can combine these hearing modalities demonstrate pronounced benefit in speech perception, listening in background noise, and music appreciation over implant recipients that rely on electrical stimulation alone. The mechanisms bestowing this benefit are unknown, but it is likely that interaction of the electric and acoustic signals in the auditory pathway plays a role. Protection of residual hearing both during and following cochlear implantation is critical for EAS. A number of surgical refinements have been implemented to protect residual hearing, and the development of hearing-protective drug and gene therapies is promising for EAS recipients.This review outlines the current field of EAS, with a focus on interactions that are observed between these modalities in animal models. It also outlines current trends in EAS surgery and gives an overview of the drug and gene therapies that are clinically translatable and may one day provide protection of residual hearing for cochlear implant recipients.
    BioMed Research International 01/2014; 2014(Article ID 350504):17 pages. · 2.71 Impact Factor

Full-text

Download
86 Downloads
Available from
Jun 1, 2014