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Properties of food grade (edible) surfactants affecting subsurface remediation of chlorinated solvents.

Environmental Science and Technology (Impact Factor: 5.26). 12/1995; 29(12):2929-35. DOI: 10.1021/es00012a007
Source: PubMed
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