Article

Trichomonas vaginalis pathobiology: new insights from the genome sequence.

Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
Advances in Parasitology (Impact Factor: 4.36). 01/2011; 77:87-140. DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-391429-3.00006-X
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The draft genome of the common sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis encodes one of the largest known proteome with 60,000 candidate proteins. This provides parasitologists and molecular cell biologists alike with exciting, yet challenging, opportunities to unravel the molecular features of the parasite's cellular systems and potentially the molecular basis of its pathobiology. Here, recent investigations addressing selected aspects of the parasite's molecular cell biology are discussed, including surface and secreted virulent factors, membrane trafficking, cell signalling, the degradome, and the potential role of RNA interference in the regulation of gene expression.

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