Article

Disaggregating the burden of substance dependence in the United States.

Laboratory of Epidemiology, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research (Impact Factor: 3.31). 03/2011; 35(3):387-8. DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01433.x
Source: PubMed
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