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The DNA Data Bank of Japan launches a new resource, the DDBJ Omics Archive of functional genomics experiments

Center for Information Biology and DNA Data Bank of Japan, National Institute of Genetics, Research Organization for Information and Systems, Yata, Mishima 411-8510, Japan.
Nucleic Acids Research (Impact Factor: 9.11). 11/2011; 40(Database issue):D38-42. DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkr994
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ; http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) maintains and provides archival, retrieval and analytical resources for biological information. The central DDBJ resource consists of public, open-access nucleotide sequence databases including raw sequence reads, assembly information and functional annotation. Database content is exchanged with EBI and NCBI within the framework of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). In 2011, DDBJ launched two new resources: the 'DDBJ Omics Archive' (DOR; http://trace.ddbj.nig.ac.jp/dor) and BioProject (http://trace.ddbj.nig.ac.jp/bioproject). DOR is an archival database of functional genomics data generated by microarray and highly parallel new generation sequencers. Data are exchanged between the ArrayExpress at EBI and DOR in the common MAGE-TAB format. BioProject provides an organizational framework to access metadata about research projects and the data from the projects that are deposited into different databases. In this article, we describe major changes and improvements introduced to the DDBJ services, and the launch of two new resources: DOR and BioProject.

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