Article

modMine: flexible access to modENCODE data

Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK.
Nucleic Acids Research (Impact Factor: 8.81). 11/2011; 40(Database issue):D1082-8. DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkr921
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In an effort to comprehensively characterize the functional elements within the genomes of the important model organisms Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, the NHGRI model organism Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) consortium has generated an enormous library of genomic data along with detailed, structured information on all aspects of the experiments. The modMine database (http://intermine.modencode.org) described here has been built by the modENCODE Data Coordination Center to allow the broader research community to (i) search for and download data sets of interest among the thousands generated by modENCODE; (ii) access the data in an integrated form together with non-modENCODE data sets; and (iii) facilitate fine-grained analysis of the above data. The sophisticated search features are possible because of the collection of extensive experimental metadata by the consortium. Interfaces are provided to allow both biologists and bioinformaticians to exploit these rich modENCODE data sets now available via modMine.

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