Article

Claudins 10 and 18 are predominantly expressed in lung adenocarcinomas and in tumors of nonsmokers.

Department of Internal Medicine, Respiratory Research Unit, Clinical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
International journal of clinical and experimental pathology (Impact Factor: 2.24). 01/2011; 4(7):667-73.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We investigated the expression of claudins 18 and 10 in a large set of primary lung carcinomas.
Immunohistochemical expression of claudin 18 was seen in 12.7 % and claudin 10 in 12.5 % of lung carcinomas. Their expression significantly associated with each other (p<0.001). The expression of claudin 18 and 10 was most prominent in lung adenocarcinomas which displayed positivity in 21.2% and 23.4 % of cases. Female patients had more often claudin 18 and 10 positive tumors, also separately in adenocarcinomas. Interestingly, claudin 10 (p=0.036) and claudin 18 (p=0.001) were more common in tumours of nonsmokers. In adenocarcinomas claudin 18 predicted a better survival (p=0.032). In Cox multivariate analysis, claudin 18 had an independent prognostic value (p=0.027).
The results show that both claudins are most commonly expressed in lung adenocarcinomas and they are more occasionally detected in other histological tumour types. Curiously, female patients and non-smokers express these claudins more commonly suggesting that they may play a part in the carcinogenesis of tobacco unrelated carcinoma. Claudin 18 associated with a better survival in lung adenocarcinoma and had an independent prognostic value and may thus be used in the evaluation of patient prognosis.

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