Article

Diagnosis and Assessment of Hoarding Disorder

Department of Psychology, Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 01063, USA.
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology (Impact Factor: 12.92). 04/2011; 8(1):219-42. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032511-143116
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The acquisition and saving of a large number of possessions that interfere with the use of living areas in the home are remarkably common behaviors that can pose serious threats to the health and safety of the affected person and those living nearby. Recent research on hoarding has led the DSM-5 Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Post-traumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group to propose the addition of hoarding disorder to the list of disorders in the upcoming revision of the diagnostic manual. This review examines the research related to the diagnosis and assessment of hoarding and hoarding disorder. The proposed criteria appear to accurately define the disorder, and preliminary studies suggest they are reliable. Recent assessment strategies for hoarding have improved our understanding of the nature of this behavior. Areas in need of further research have been highlighted.

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    • "Compulsive hoarding is often 'ego-syntonic', and the Y–BOCS is not a specific measure of this disorder. Frost et al. have developed specific measures for hoarding (Frost et al., 2012). Analysis of one large trials database indicates that the 'hoarding/symmetry' dimension predicts a poorer outcome to SSRI treatment compared with other OCD dimensions (Stein et al., 2008). "
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