Validity of two new patient-reported outcome measures in systemic sclerosis: Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-Item Health Profile and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Dyspnea Short Form

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois 60611, USA.
Arthritis care & research 11/2011; 63(11):1620-8. DOI: 10.1002/acr.20591
Source: PubMed


Many patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments used in systemic sclerosis (SSc) trials are limited by lack of validation, licensing fees, and complicated scoring systems. We assessed the construct validity for discriminative purposes of 2 new PRO instruments, the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item Health Profile (PROMIS-29) and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Dyspnea short form (FACIT-Dyspnea), measuring health status and dyspnea in SSc patients.
Seventy-three patients participated in a cross-sectional study at a tertiary SSc program. PROMIS-29, FACIT-Dyspnea, and legacy PRO instruments used in clinical trials (Medical Research Council Dyspnea Score, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index, and Short Form 36) were administered. Composite severity scores using an adaptation of the Medsger Disease Severity Index were generated using clinical, diagnostic, and laboratory information. PROMIS-29 and FACIT-Dyspnea scores were compared with legacy PRO measures and composite severity scores.
The mean patient age (84% women) was 51 years (range 22-72 years). The mean SSc disease duration from the onset of the first non-Raynaud's phenomenon symptom was 7.2 years (range 0-45 years). Spearman's correlation coefficients across FACIT-Dyspnea and PROMIS physical functioning scores with legacy PRO instruments were generally high (range 0.50-0.86); those between PROMIS and FACIT-Dyspnea with composite disease severity scores were more modest, but statistically significant (range 0.33-0.48, P < 0.01).
PROMIS-29 and FACIT-Dyspnea are valid instruments to measure the health status of SSc patients. PROMIS-29 and FACIT-Dyspnea may be preferable to legacy instruments because they are freely available in multiple languages and simple to administer, score, and interpret.

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Available from: Rowland W Chang, Jan 07, 2014
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    • "The FACIT-Dyspnea short form comprises 10 items that describe the experience of shortness of breath when doing a range of common tasks in the past week, with each item scored on a 4-point rating scale (from 0 [no shortness of breath] to 3 [severe shortness of breath]) [16,17]. FACIT-Dyspnea scores are generated using the T-score metric, where summary scores from responses to items are transformed into a scale with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation [SD] of 10 for patients with self-reported COPD [18]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 43-item short form (PROMIS-43) and the five-level EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L) are recently developed measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL) that have potentially broad application in evaluating treatments and capturing burden of respiratory-related diseases. The aims of this study were: (1) to examine their psychometric properties in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and (2) to identify dimensions of HRQL that differ and do not differ by lung function. Methods We conducted a multi-center, cross-sectional study (“COPD Outcomes-based Network for Clinical Effectiveness & Research Translation” [CONCERT]). We analyzed patients who met spirometric criteria for COPD, and completed EQ-5D-5L and PROMIS questionnaires. Disease severity was graded based on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classification. Pulmonary function test, PROMIS-43, EQ-5D (index score and EQ-Visual Analog Scale [EQ-VAS]), six minute walk test (6MWT), and three dyspnea scales (mMRC, Borg, FACIT-Dyspnea) were administered. Validity and reliability of EQ-5D-5L and PROMIS-43 were examined, and differences in HRQL by GOLD grade were assessed. Results Data from 670 patients with COPD were analyzed (mean age 68.5 years; 58% male). More severe COPD was associated with more problems with mobility, self-care and usual activities (all p-values <0.01) according to EQ-5D-5L. Related domains on EQ-5D-5L, PROMIS and clinical measures were moderately (r = 0.30-0.49) to strongly (r ≥ 0.50) correlated. A statistically significant trend of decreasing HRQL with more severe lung functions was observed for EQ-5D-5L index scores, EQ-VAS scores, and PROMIS physical function and social roles. Conclusions Results supported the validity of EQ-5D-5L and PROMIS-43 in COPD patients, and indicate that physical function and social activities decrease with level of lung function by GOLD grade, but not pain, mental health, sleep or fatigue as reported by patients.
    BMC Medical Research Methodology 06/2014; 14(1):78. DOI:10.1186/1471-2288-14-78 · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    06/2012; 64(6):942-3; author reply 943-4. DOI:10.1002/acr.21578
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    ABSTRACT: Psychosocial and rehabilitation interventions are increasingly used to attenuate disability and improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) in chronic diseases, but are typically not available for patients with rare diseases. Conducting rigorous, adequately powered trials of these interventions for patients with rare diseases is difficult. The Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network (SPIN) is an international collaboration of patient organisations, clinicians and researchers. The aim of SPIN is to develop a research infrastructure to test accessible, low-cost self-guided online interventions to reduce disability and improve HRQL for people living with the rare disease systemic sclerosis (SSc or scleroderma). Once tested, effective interventions will be made accessible through patient organisations partnering with SPIN. SPIN will employ the cohort multiple randomised controlled trial (cmRCT) design, in which patients consent to participate in a cohort for ongoing data collection. The aim is to recruit 1500-2000 patients from centres across the world within a period of 5 years (2013-2018). Eligible participants are persons ≥18 years of age with a diagnosis of SSc. In addition to baseline medical data, participants will complete patient-reported outcome measures every 3 months. Upon enrolment in the cohort, patients will consent to be contacted in the future to participate in intervention research and to allow their data to be used for comparison purposes for interventions tested with other cohort participants. Once interventions are developed, patients from the cohort will be randomly selected and offered interventions as part of pragmatic RCTs. Outcomes from patients offered interventions will be compared with outcomes from trial-eligible patients who are not offered the interventions. The use of the cmRCT design, the development of self-guided online interventions and partnerships with patient organisations will allow SPIN to develop, rigourously test and effectively disseminate psychosocial and rehabilitation interventions for people with SSc.
    BMJ Open 08/2013; 3(8). DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003563 · 2.27 Impact Factor
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