Article

True microbiota involved in chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients found by culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis.

Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry, and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
Journal of clinical microbiology (Impact Factor: 4.16). 12/2011; 49(12):4352-5. DOI: 10.1128/JCM.06092-11
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) develop chronic lung infection. In this study, we investigated the microorganisms present in transplanted CF lungs (n = 5) by standard culturing and 16S rRNA gene analysis. A correspondence between culturing and the molecular methods was observed. In conclusion, standard culturing seems reliable for the identification of the dominating pathogens.

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