Article

A comprehensive glossary of autophagy-related molecules and processes (2nd edition).

Life Sciences Institute, and Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
Autophagy (Impact Factor: 11.42). 11/2011; 7(11):1273-94. DOI: 10.4161/auto.7.11.17661
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The study of autophagy is rapidly expanding, and our knowledge of the molecular mechanism and its connections to a wide range of physiological processes has increased substantially in the past decade. The vocabulary associated with autophagy has grown concomitantly. In fact, it is difficult for readers--even those who work in the field--to keep up with the ever-expanding terminology associated with the various autophagy-related processes. Accordingly, we have developed a comprehensive glossary of autophagy-related terms that is meant to provide a quick reference for researchers who need a brief reminder of the regulatory effects of transcription factors and chemical agents that induce or inhibit autophagy, the function of the autophagy-related proteins, and the roles of accessory components and structures that are associated with autophagy.

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