Article

Factors related to self-efficacy for social participation of people with mental illness.

Bunri University of Hospitality, Saitama, Japan.
Archives of psychiatric nursing (Impact Factor: 0.9). 10/2011; 25(5):359-65. DOI: 10.1016/j.apnu.2011.03.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study investigated factors related to self-efficacy for social participation of individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). A total of 142 people with SMI recruited from a variety of rehabilitation programs completed an anonymous self-report questionnaire that assessed self-efficacy for social participation, general self-efficacy, self-esteem, general mental health, social support, and life satisfaction. Employed participants reported significantly greater self-efficacy for social participation, general self-efficacy, and life satisfaction than those who did not work. Participants using a day service reported having significantly fewer people providing social support than those not using one. Clinical implications and future direction for research are discussed.

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