Article

Garlic (Allium sativum) supplementation with standard antidiabetic agent provides better diabetic control in type 2 diabetes patients.

Department of Pharmacology, University of Karachi, Pakistan.
Pakistan journal of pharmaceutical sciences (Impact Factor: 0.95). 10/2011; 24(4):565-70.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Garlic has been used safely since ancient times as both food and medicine in human populations, but studies of its efficacy in the management of diabetes have yielded conflicting results. This study has evaluated the potential hypoglycemic effects of garlic in type 2 diabetic patients. The study was conducted in diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients (n=60) with fasting blood sugar level above 126 mg/dl to evaluate the effects of adding garlic tablets with standard antidiabetic therapy on blood sugar. Patients were divided randomly into 2 groups. Group 1 (n=30) was given tablet Garlic (KWAI) 300 mg thrice daily + Metformin 500 mg twice daily and Group 2 (n=30) was given Placebo+Metformin 500 mg twice daily respectively for 24 weeks. Serum lipids and fasting blood glucose were measured at week 0, 12 and week 24. Group1 showed significant reduction in fasting blood sugar at week 24 with a percentage decrease of (-3.12 percent) (P = <0.005) as compared to group 2 (0.59 percent). At the end of week 24, GR1 group also showed considerable decrease in mean total cholesterol (6.2 mg/dl, -2.82%, P=<0.005), LDL-C (-3 mg/dl, 2.18% P=<0.005), triglycerides (-5.2 mg/dl, 3.12%, P<0.005) while HDL cholesterol was significantly increased (2.36 mg/dl, 6.72%, P<0.005) as compared to GR2 group. Combination of garlic with typical antidiabetic remedy has shown to improve glycemic control in addition to antihyperlipidemic activity. Garlic may be a good addition in the management of patients with diabetes and hyperlipidemia.

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