Article

Pulmonary hypertension and reopening of the ductus arteriosus in an infant treated with diazoxide.

Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Ankara Child Diseases, Hematology and Oncology Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism: JPEM (Impact Factor: 0.75). 01/2011; 24(7-8):603-5. DOI: 10.1515/jpem.2011.238
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Diazoxide is the main therapeutic agent for persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Generally, it is tolerated well, but rarely it can cause severe life-threatening complications. We report a neonate who was treated with diazoxide for hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. On the 6th day of the treatment we observed sepsis-mimicking symptoms, mild pulmonary hypertension, and re-opening of the ductus arteriosus. All these findings resolved dramatically shortly after discontinuation of treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of re-opening of the ductus arteriosus due to diazoxide toxicity.

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