Article

Chromosome 9 ALS and FTD locus is probably derived from a single founder.

Reta Lila Weston Research Laboratories, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK.
Neurobiology of aging (Impact Factor: 4.85). 09/2011; 33(1):209.e3-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2011.08.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We and others have recently reported an association between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 9p21 in several populations. Here we show that the associated haplotype is the same in all populations and that several families previously shown to have genetic linkage to this region also share this haplotype. The most parsimonious explanation of these data are that there is a single founder for this form of disease.

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Available from: Ammar Al-Chalabi, Jan 20, 2014
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