Article

Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
Nature Genetics (Impact Factor: 29.65). 09/2011; 43(10):1005-11. DOI: 10.1038/ng.922
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P = 2.7 × 10(-8) to P = 2.3 × 10(-13)) four new PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV and 11q24.3 near ADAMTS8), two new MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4 and 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both of these traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) that has also recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the new PP loci, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite of that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants, which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings suggest new genetic pathways underlying blood pressure variation, some of which may differentially influence SBP and DBP.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
682 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies are very powerful in determining the genetic variants affecting complex diseases. Most of the available methods are very useful in detecting association between common variants and complex diseases. Recently, methods to detect rare variants in association with complex diseases have been developed with the increasingly available sequencing data from next-generation sequencing. In this paper, we evaluate and compare several of these recent methods for performing statistical association using whole genome sequencing data in pedigrees. Specifically, functional principal component analysis (FPCA), extended combined multivariate and collapsing (CMC) method for families, a generalized T(2) method, and chi-square minimum approach were compared by analyzing all the genetic variants, common and rare, of both the real data set and the simulated data set provided as part of Genetic Analysis Workshop 18.
    BMC proceedings 01/2014; 8(Suppl 1):S48.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The genetic variants associated with blood pressure identified so far explain only a small proportion of the total heritability of this trait. With recent advances in sequencing technology and statistical methodology, it becomes feasible to study the association between blood pressure and rare genetic variants. Using real baseline phenotype data and imputed dosage data from Genetic Analysis Workshop 18, we performed a candidate gene association analysis. We focused on 8 genes shown to be associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure to identify the association with both common and rare genetic variants, and then did a genome-wide rare-variant analysis on blood pressure. We performed association analysis for rare coding and splicing variants within each gene region and all rare variants in each sliding window, using either burden tests or sequence kernel association tests accounting for familial correlation. With a sample size of only 747, we failed to find any novel associated genetic loci. Consequently, we performed analyses on simulated data, with knowledge of the underlying simulating model, to evaluate the type I error rate and power for the methods used in real data analysis.
    BMC proceedings 01/2014; 8(Suppl 1):S35.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: White matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin increase the risk of stroke and dementia. Despite strong WMH heritability, few gene associations have been identified. Relevant experimental models may be informative. We tested the associations between genes that were differentially expressed in brains of young spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats and human WMH (using volume and visual score) in 621 subjects from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936). We then attempted replication in 9361 subjects from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE). We also tested the subjects from LBC1936 for previous genome-wide WMH associations found in subjects from CHARGE. Of 126 spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat genes, 10 were nominally associated with WMH volume or score in subjects from LBC1936, of which 5 (AFP, ALB, GNAI1, RBM8a, and MRPL18) were associated with both WMH volume and score (P<0.05); 2 of the 10 (XPNPEP1, P=6.7×10(-5); FARP1, P=0.024) plus another spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat gene (USMG5, P=0.00014), on chromosomes 10, 13, and 10 respectively, were associated with WMH in subjects from CHARGE. Gene set enrichment showed significant associations for downregulated spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat genes with WMH in humans. In subjects from LBC1936, we replicated CHARGE's genome-wide WMH associations on chromosomes 17 (TRIM65 and TRIM47) and, for the first time, 1 (PMF1). Despite not passing multiple testing thresholds individually, these genes collectively are relevant to known WMH associations, proposed WMH mechanisms, or dementia: associations with Alzheimer's disease, late-life depression, ATP production, osmotic regulation, neurodevelopmental abnormalities, and cognitive impairment. If replicated further, they suggest a multifactorial nature for WMH and argue for more consideration of vascular contributions to dementia. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    01/2015;

Full-text

Download
136 Downloads
Available from
May 30, 2014