Article

The myogenic kinome: protein kinases critical to mammalian skeletal myogenesis

Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8L6, Canada. .
Skeletal muscle 09/2011; 1(1):29. DOI: 10.1186/2044-5040-1-29
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT ABSTRACT: Myogenesis is a complex and tightly regulated process, the end result of which is the formation of a multinucleated myofibre with contractile capability. Typically, this process is described as being regulated by a coordinated transcriptional hierarchy. However, like any cellular process, myogenesis is also controlled by members of the protein kinase family, which transmit and execute signals initiated by promyogenic stimuli. In this review, we describe the various kinases involved in mammalian skeletal myogenesis: which step of myogenesis a particular kinase regulates, how it is activated (if known) and what its downstream effects are. We present a scheme of protein kinase activity, similar to that which exists for the myogenic transcription factors, to better clarify the complex signalling that underlies muscle development.

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Available from: Rashmi Kothary, Jul 29, 2015
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    • "For example, does cytoplasmic ERK promote myogenic differentiation (or inhibits cell proliferation), and more specifically how does nuclear ERK suppress the differentiation of muscle progenitors? A plausible scenario for the effect of ERK on cell cycle progression, supported by the known functions of ERK in myogenesis (Knight and Kothary, 2011) and partially by our data (Figs 1, 2), is the following: activation of ERK and its translocation to the nucleus lead to the shuttling of p21 to Fig. 6 "
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    • "For example, does cytoplasmic ERK promote myogenic differentiation (or inhibits cell proliferation), and more specifically how does nuclear ERK suppress the differentiation of muscle progenitors? A plausible scenario for the effect of ERK on cell cycle progression, supported by the known functions of ERK in myogenesis (Knight and Kothary, 2011) and partially by our data (Figs 1, 2), is the following: activation of ERK and its translocation to the nucleus lead to the shuttling of p21 to Fig. 6 "
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