Article

Single dose oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain in adults

Pain Research and Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Nuffield Division of Anaesthetics), University of Oxford, Pain Research Unit, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK, OX3 7LJ.
Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) (Impact Factor: 5.94). 01/2011; 9(9):CD008659. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD008659.pub2
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Thirty-five Cochrane Reviews of randomised trials testing the analgesic efficacy of individual drug interventions in acute postoperative pain have been published. This overview brings together the results of all those reviews and assesses the reliability of available data.
To summarise data from all Cochrane Reviews that have assessed the effects of pharmaceutical interventions for acute pain in adults with at least moderate pain following surgery, who have been given a single dose of oral analgesic taken alone.
We identified systematic reviews in The Cochrane Library through a simple search strategy. All reviews were overseen by a single Review Group, had a standard title, and had as their primary outcome numbers of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours compared with placebo. For individual reviews we extracted the number needed to treat (NNT) for this outcome for each drug/dose combination, and also the percentage of participants achieving at least 50% maximum pain relief, the mean of mean or median time to remedication, the percentage of participants remedicating by 6, 8, 12, or 24 hours, and results for participants experiencing at least one adverse event.
The overview included 35 separate Cochrane Reviews with 38 analyses of single dose oral analgesics tested in acute postoperative pain models, with results from about 45,000 participants studied in approximately 350 individual studies. The individual reviews included only high-quality trials of standardised design and outcome reporting. The reviews used standardised methods and reporting for both efficacy and harm. Event rates with placebo were consistent in larger data sets. No statistical comparison was undertaken.There were reviews but no trial data were available for acemetacin, meloxicam, nabumetone, nefopam, sulindac, tenoxicam, and tiaprofenic acid. Inadequate amounts of data were available for dexibuprofen, dextropropoxyphene 130 mg, diflunisal 125 mg, etoricoxib 60 mg, fenbufen, and indometacin. Where there was adequate information for drug/dose combinations (at least 200 participants, in at least two studies), we defined the addition of four comparisons of typical size (400 participants in total) with zero effect as making the result potentially subject to publication bias and therefore unreliable. Reliable results were obtained for 46 drug/dose combinations in all painful postsurgical conditions; 45 in dental pain and 14 in other painful conditions.NNTs varied from about 1.5 to 20 for at least 50% maximum pain relief over four to six hours compared with placebo. The proportion of participants achieving this level of benefit varied from about 30% to over 70%, and the time to remedication varied from two hours (placebo) to over 20 hours in the same pain condition. Participants reporting at least one adverse event were few and generally no different between active drug and placebo, with a few exceptions, principally for aspirin and opioids.Drug/dose combinations with good (low) NNTs were ibuprofen 400 mg (2.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.4 to 2.6), diclofenac 50 mg (2.7; 95% CI 2.4 to 3.0), etoricoxib 120 mg (1.9; 95% CI 1.7 to 2.1), codeine 60 mg + paracetamol 1000 mg (2.2; 95% CI 1.8 to 2.9), celecoxib 400 mg (2.5; 95% CI 2.2 to 2.9), and naproxen 500/550 mg (2.7; 95% CI 2.3 to 3.3). Long duration of action (≥ 8 hours) was found for etoricoxib 120 mg, diflunisal 500 mg, oxycodone 10 mg + paracetamol 650 mg, naproxen 500/550 mg, and celecoxib 400 mg.Not all participants had good pain relief and for many drug/dose combinations 50% or more did not achieve at last 50% maximum pain relief over four to six hours.
There is a wealth of reliable evidence on the analgesic efficacy of single dose oral analgesics. There is also important information on drugs for which there are no data, inadequate data, or where results are unreliable due to susceptibility to publication bias. This should inform choices by professionals and consumers.

1 Follower
 · 
111 Views
  • Source
    • "Relative efficacy of several analgesics according to the nnt in acute pain [5] [16] [33] (NNT: Number of patients necessary to treat in order to achieve a 50% relief of moderate to severe postoperative pain after a single dose) "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Just as pain is a symptom with multifarious causes, many approaches can be taken to its management. Once a correct diagnosis has been made, treatment of pain may be chosen from among drug therapy, surgical or other intervention, nerve stimulation, radio waves, physical manipulation, lifestyle changes, psychological and alternative approaches. Thus, medical practitioners involved in assisting patients to manage their pain come from a broad range of fields including clinical psychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, nurses, anesthesiologists, neurologists, physiatrists, psychiatrists and professionals involved in the palliative care of patients. This book seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of the topic of pain management. In so doing, it will act as a resource for students, physicians and other health care professionals, as well as those requiring information in order to better understand their options regarding management of their own pain or that of family members in their care.
    Pain Management, Edited by Gabor Racz, 05/2014: chapter Multimodal Analgesia for the management of postoperative pain: pages 1-42; In Tech Open Access Publisher., ISBN: 980-953-307-1133-0
  • Pain 03/2011; 152(8):1693-4. DOI:10.1016/j.pain.2011.03.007 · 5.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article provides a summary of the efficacy, and relative efficacy, of 38 different drugs or drug combinations tested in standard postoperative pain trials. It will help clinicians and patients make informed choices about analgesia based on pain relief, duration of action, and adverse events, which can then be put into context for the individual patient, depending on local availability. This article highlights the fact that no single drug is effective in all patients--even the best drugs fail to provide good levels of pain relief in at least 30%. These patients should try a different analgesic.
    British dental journal official journal of the British Dental Association: BDJ online 11/2011; 211(9):419-20. DOI:10.1038/sj.bdj.2011.905 · 1.08 Impact Factor
Show more