Article

Exercise improves lung function and habitual activity in children with cystic fibrosis

Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.
Journal of cystic fibrosis: official journal of the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (Impact Factor: 3.82). 09/2011; 11(1):18-23. DOI: 10.1016/j.jcf.2011.08.003
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease leads to progressive deterioration in exercise capacity. Because physical activity has been shown to improve lung function and quality of life (QoL), developing routine exercise programs can benefit this patient population.
Lung function, nutritional status, and exercise capacity and assessments of habitual activity and QoL were measured before and after a two-month, subject-designed exercise regimen based on self-reported activity assessment. Statistical analysis included Wilcoxon signed-rank, Wilcoxon rank sum, and Fisher's exact tests.
Subjects completing the study demonstrated significant improvement in exercise capacity and body image perception, a CF-specific QoL measure (p<0.001). In secondary analyses, subjects improving exercise capacity showed significant increases in lung function and self-reported habitual activity.
Increases in exercise capacity over a two-month period resulted in significantly improved lung function and self-reported habitual activity. Longer, controlled trials are needed to develop individualized exercise recommendations.

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Available from: Peter J Mogayzel, Mar 26, 2014
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    • "Regular exercise may help to maintain or increase lung function [1] and increase the effectiveness of airway clearance techniques in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) [2]. It may also improve aerobic capacity, muscle strength and lung function [3]. "
    British journal of hospital medicine (London, England: 2005) 03/2013; 74(3):130-130. DOI:10.12968/hmed.2013.74.3.130 · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    • "Regular exercise may help to maintain or increase lung function [1] and increase the effectiveness of airway clearance techniques in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) [2]. It may also improve aerobic capacity, muscle strength and lung function [3]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Cystic fibrosis is a multisystem disease where the main problems are existing in the respiratory system. Aerobic exercise programs are effective in increasing physical fitness and muscle endurance in addition to chest physiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chest physiotherapy and aerobic exercise training on physical fitness in young children with cystic fibrosis. Sixteen patients with cystic fibrosis, between the ages 5-13 years, were included in this study. All children were assessed at the beginning and at the end of 6 week of the training. Modified Bruce protocol was used for assessing the cardiovascular endurance. The sit-up test was used to evaluate the dynamic endurance of abdominal muscles, standing long jump was used to test power, sit and reach, trunk lateral flexion, trunk hyperextension, trunk rotation and forward bending tests were used to assess flexibility, 20 m shuttle run test and 10-step stair climbing tests were used to assess power and agility. All patients received chest physiotherapy and aerobic training, three days a week for six weeks. Active cycle of breathing technique and aerobic exercise training program on a treadmill were applied. By evaluating the results of the training, positive progressions in all parameters except 20 m shuttle run and 10 stairs climbing tests were observed (p < 0.05). Active cycle of breathing techniques were used together with exercise training in clinically stable cystic fibrosis patients increases thoracic mobility (p < 0.05) and the physical fitness parameters such as muscle endurance, strength and speed (p < 0.05). Comparison of the results in sit and reach and forward bending tests were not significant (p > 0.05). It is thought that in addition to medical approaches to the systems affected, the active cycle of breathing techniques along with aerobic training helps to enhance the aerobic performance, thoracic mobility and improves physical fitness in children with cystic fibrosis.
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